Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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38th Annual Convention; Seattle, WA; 2012

Event Details


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Poster Session #87
DEV Poster Session
Saturday, May 26, 2012
5:00 PM–7:00 PM
Exhibit Hall 4AB (Convention Center)
1. The Use of Auditory Matching to Improve Instructional Outcomes for Students With Autism
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
NICOLE LUKE (Surrey Place Centre), Vicky Simos (Surrey Place Centre), Laura Endicott (Surrey Place Centre), Urvashi Sirur (Aisling Discoveries Child and Family Centre), Julia Jones (Toronto Partnership for Autism Services)
Abstract:

The CABAS Auditory Matching Protocol (Chavez-Brown, 2005) has a history of successful use in a number of cases. Benefits of completing the procedure have included improved articulation, acquisition of the listener half of Naming, and increased rates of learning for students. Infant developmental research suggests that a child may need to acquire the ability to match auditory sounds in her environment in order to move toward the integration of information from several sensory systems, a necessary step in the development of the independence of the individual. This poster reports on a systematic replication in an applied setting of use of this instructional strategy. Seven participants, all diagnosed with autism, and ranging in age from 5-7 years, were identified as having either a deficit in articulation or were missing the listener half of Naming. They were taught using the Auditory Matching procedure during the course of their instructional day at a treatment centre where they were undergoing intensive behavioural intervention (IBI). Pre and post probes were conducted with each participant and results as well as performance during the procedure are reported.

 
2. The Effects of Face Conditioning Protocol on Inducing Listener Behavior for Two Nursery School Students With Developmental Delays
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
SUZZANNA JAVED (Teachers College, Columbia University), Susan Buttigieg (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

We tested the effects of the face conditioning protocol on inducing listener behavior for 2-nursery school students with developmental delays using a multiple probe design across participants. The conditioning procedure used a conjugate stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure to condition adult faces as reinforcers. Two students diagnosed with developmental delays were selected to participate in this study because they did not attend to the experimenters faces. The participants were selected from a CABAS classroom in a publically-funded, privately-run preschool. The dependent variables were: a) the numbers of opportunities, out of 20, that the participants attended to the experimenters faces; b) the cumulative amount of time per session (20 trials) the participants attended to the experimenters faces; c) 1-step vocal directions; and d) 1- and 2- step gross motor imitation. The independent variable was the presence of conditioned reinforcement and the procedure used was a conjugate stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure implemented to induce these foundational cusps. The results showed a significant increase in correct responses on listener behavior for both participants.

 
3. The Efficacy of a Clinical Intervention Designed to Decrease Disruptive Vocalizations in an Older Adult With Dementia
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
KIRSTIE HATHAWAY (Rehabilitation Institute, Southern Illinois University), Leah Conner (Rehabilitation Institute, Southern Illinois University), Kathleen Fairchild (Rehabilitation Institute, Southern Illinois University), Jonathan C. Baker (Southern Illinois University)
Abstract:

The goal of this study was to decrease the disruptive vocalizations that were exhibited by an older adult with dementia who lived in a long-term care facility. Auditory stimuli in the form of hymns and nature music were played during10 minute sessions randomly over approximately a month's time. During the initial baseline, disruptive vocalizations occurred at 2.35 responses per minute. In the initial treatment phase, the target behavior occurred at 0.72 responses per minute. In the second baseline phase, the target behavior occurred at 3.03 responses per minute, and during the final treatment phase, disruptive vocalizations occurred at near zero responses per minute.

 
4. Behavioral Support, Age, and Arm Reaching Modes
Area: DEV; Domain: Basic Research
ANGEL JIMENEZ (Universidad de Guadalajara)
Abstract:

Studies reveal that with aging biomechanical constraints increase, affecting daily aspects of the life of older adults, such as when reaching for objects with the arms. Sixteen older adults (mean age = 70.1 years) reached for a plastic block placed on a table at different distances in a discrete trials procedure. The distances to which the block was located were defined in relation to every subject's absolute critical boundary. Trials were videotaped and the action modes used by the subjects when reaching were registered. The older adults data were compared with data obtained with 16 college students (mean age = 19.4 years). Reaching modes changed their distribution orderly as a function of the distance of the block. The reaching mode changed from using only arm extension to using the shoulder or upper torso at closer distances than the absolute critical boundary. Older adults changed the distribution of their reaching modes at closer distances than college students. These results support the conclusion that the choice of the reaching mode is influenced by the subject's body size, muscular strength, and joint flexibility. These data could be useful for the development of standards for sizing work surfaces for older adults.

 
5. CANCELED: Breaching Limits and Defying Boundaries: I Woke Up One Day and Decided to Run a Marathon
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
BRIAN KEE (University of Memphis), Laura Baylot Casey (University of Memphis), Megan Elizabeth Vonderheide Hubbard (University of Memphis)
Abstract:

Breaching limits and defying boundaries. Despite overwhelming odds, a man wakes up one day and decides to embark on a journey of epic proportions to change the course of his life. Basic principles of applied behavior analysis are utilized including: measurement of performance variables, data collecting, goal setting, data analysis. and graphing data to propel a man towards his goal of completing a marathon.

 
6. Relations Between Visual Perspective Taking and False Belief Skills in 5-year-old Children
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
MARIA BAQUERO (Universidad de Oviedo), Lorena Garcia-Asenjo (Universidad de Oviedo), Luis Antonio Perez-Gonzalez (Universidad de Oviedo)
Abstract:

The main goal of this study was to identify the relations between visual perspective taking (VPT) and false belief (FB) skills. The participants were 15 typically developing children, their ages ranged from 5-to-6 years-old. Each participant was evaluated in 2 probes of Level 1 of VPT, 3 probes of Level 2 of VPT (with verbal, picture-selection, and object-selection responses), and 2 FB probes (the appearance-reality and unexpected transfer probes). Fourteen children passed the probes of Level 1 of VPT, 14 children passed one or more of the 3 probes of Level 2 of VPT, and 11 children passed at least one of FB probes. This data showed that (a) 10 children passed the 2 probes of FB and they met the criterion in the Level 1 of VPT probe and in the Level 2 of VPT with verbal and photo selection responses, (b) 3 children did not pass the FB probes but they met the criterion in one or more of the Level 1 of VPT probe and at least in the Level 2 of VPT with verbal responses. These data show that these skills are interelated but it is necessary to identify other pre-requisites skills.

 
7. Effects of Assessment of Prerequisite Skills in Performance on Probes of Level 2 Visual Perspective Taking
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
MARIA BAQUERO (Universidad de Oviedo), Lorena Garcia-Asenjo (Universidad de Oviedo), Luis Antonio Perez-Gonzalez (Universidad de Oviedo)
Abstract:

Level 2 of visual perspective taking (VPT) consists of responding differentially according to the visual perception of oneself and other person, when both people are seeing the same object from different perspectives. The main goal of this study was to analyze the effect of the assesment of prerequisite skills in performance on Level 2 of VPT probes. The participants were 4 typically developing children, their ages ranged from 3-to-5 years-old. First, each participant was evaluated in 3 probes of Level 2 of VPT (verbal, pictures selection and object selection). Second, each participant was evaluated in three prerequisites skills: tacts, discriminations and orientation of the positions of an object, and then in the same 3 probes of Level 2 VPT. All children showed more correct responses in Level 2 probes after being evaluated in prerequisite skills. These data shows that previous exposure to the prerequisite skills improves childrens performance on probes of Level 2 of VPT.

 
 

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