Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

31st Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2005

Program by Workshops: Saturday, May 28, 2005


Manage My Personal Schedule

 

Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Schedule-Induced Behaviors: Origins of Excessive Behaviors and Procedures to Minimize Their Influence
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford A (3rd floor)
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Jeff Kupfer, Ph.D.
JEFF KUPFER (Florida Residential Solutions, LLC)
Description: Schedule-induced or adjunctive behaviors (sometimes maladaptive and always excessive) are behaviors that are maintained at a high probability by stimuli that derive their reinforcing properties as a function of parameters governing the availability of some other class of reinforcement. In non-human subjects, some schedules of reinforcement have been shown to generate strange behaviors such as: polydipsia, attack against members of its own species, self-induced escape, pica, and hyperactivity; In human subjects, these same schedules can exaggerate behaviors such as fluid intake, aggression, pacing, grooming, eating, stereotyped behavior, smoking and, quite possibly-- wretched excess. This presentation is an introduction to schedule-induced behaviors. A brief video-tape will be shown demonstrating various types of schedule-induced behaviors in a rat and pigeon. Studies describing functional relationships with reinforcement schedules and generator schedules (i.e., schedules that promote schedule-induced behaviors) will be reviewed, as well as functional assessment and measurement strategies. Alternative reinforcement strategies in applied settings will be reviewed and case studies will be presented comparing fixed- vs. variable-DRO schedules.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop participants will be able to: - Provide introduction into schedule-induced behavior and expand functional analysis approaches - Review methods to measure and assess schedule-induced behavior - Describe possible pitfalls in using common schedules of reinforcement - Provide alternatives to minimize the influence of schedule-induced behaviors
Activities: Participate in discussion regarding: contents of literature review; measurement and assessment suggestions; procedures to maximize effects of positive reinforcement and minimizing the influence of reinforcement schedules that induce excessive behaviors; and environmental management strategies to channel excessive behaviors into more productive and adaptive outlets.
Audience: Professionals and paraprofessionals actively involved in developing, implementing and monitoring behavior treatment plans, students that desire a review of schedule-induced behaviors and implications.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Clients with Maladaptive Habits, Tics, Tourettes Syndrome, and Stuttering Using the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Program
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Boulevard A (2nd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: R. Gregory Nunn, Ph.D.
R. GREGORY NUNN (National University)
Description: Maladaptive and undesirable habits, tics, Tourettes Syndrome (TS), and stuttering are extremely common problems which can seriously affect the personal relationships and self-esteem of individuals who suffer from them. Because these problems can cause acute psychological distress, many different types of treatments for them have been developed. Habit Reversal is a behavioral treatment approach which has proven to be an effective, General treatment for habits and tics including TS (Azrin & Nunn, 1973; Azrin & Nunn, 1977; Nunn, 1978; Azrin, Nunn & Frantz, 1980; Azrin & Peterson, 1988a; Finney, Rapoff, Hall, & Christopherson, 1983; Franco, 1981; Zikis, 1983: Miltenberger, 2001).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify and diagnose maladaptive habits, tics, TS, and stuttering with children and adults. - Understand the theoretical rationales that have spawned the many treatments for these types of problems. - Understand the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Procedures. - Understand common pitfalls of treatment and ways of overcoming them.
Activities: In this Workshop we will discuss the identification, nature, and treatment of children, adolescents, and adults with these type of problems. Specifically we will cover the diagnosis and treatment of individuals using the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Procedures of Azrin and Nunn as well as treatment variations that have evolved from their original work. Case studies are included where possible and workshop participants are strongly encouraged to provide input.
Audience: All practitioners, educators, and other professionals working with children, adolescents, or adults presenting with these types of problems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Toilet Training for Autistic & Encopretic Children: Data-Based Bio-Behavioral Intervention
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford B (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Ben-Zvi, M.A.
MICHAEL BEN-ZVI (NATAV Private Practice, Israel)
Description: While early intensive interventions are widely used to improve communicative, cognitive and other skills, toilet training for autistic children is still a challenge to behavior analysis. Encopresis is a very disturbing illness, not so rare with normal children. The combination of those two is even worse. The use of Reflexes and Respondent conditioning (in combination with operant conditioning) is needed for complex behaviors that are only partly Operant. The purpose of this workshop is to address that need, especially for the acquiring of proper bowl movement on toilet, both for Encopretic and Autistic children. The workshop will cover the theoretical assumptions behind the intervention, the protocol of treatment and its accommodations to each child. Ethical considerations, Data collection and decision making in the course of intervention will be discussed. Case studies will be presented, and the toilet training of urination will be addressed shortly.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participant will be able to: - Know and understand the protocol of intervention - Explain the intervention to parent of non trained child - Gather the required data for decision making before and through the intervention - Detect the relevant symptom of Encopresis and apply the proper intervention. - Address ethical considerations and rejections. - Support parents through implementation of the intervention.
Activities: Activities will include presentation of both rational and practical issues, analyzing data records, practicing the collection of data on relevant Data sheets, and discussion of questions.
Audience: Behavior analysts, consultants and program managers of interventions with autistic population, clinicians who address Encopresis, parent of Encopretic and autistic children.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Train Caregivers in Functional Behavioral Assessment and Treatment Development
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4A (4th floor)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Julia T. O'Connor, Ph.D.
JULIA T. O'CONNOR (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Description: As the functional behavior assessment methodology has expanded from the highly controlled research context to homes, schools and community settings, more questions have arisen regarding how to incorporate the family and other caregivers of the client into the assessment and treatment process. Caregiver participation in behavioral assessments allows the clinician to establish a context that more closely replicates the conditions in the natural environment. This workshop is designed to train professionals how to collaborate with parents throughout the functional analysis and treatment development process. The primary focus will be to assist the professional in teaching parents and other caregivers of children with developmental disabilities how to analyze behavior and develop function based treatment strategies in a collaborative relationship. Participants will have the opportunity to practice in small groups. Materials will be provided to participants including how to define behavior, identify target situations, and identify potential reinforcers as well as sample data collection sheets and other handouts describing the principles of applied behavior analysis and conducting functional analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Train caregivers how to define target maladaptive behaviors. - Train caregivers to conduct stimulus preference assessments and functional analyses in home and community settings. - Train caregivers to identify appropriate alternative/adaptive behaviors. - Train caregivers how to link functional analysis outcomes to possible treatment strategies. - Assess caregiver integrity on implementation of the functional analysis and treatment.
Activities: Participants will be involved in didactic presentation, discussion, and interactive activities.
Audience: Clinicians working with parents with developmentally disabled children with behavior problems. Masters level therapists, psychologists, and family members are welcome. Participants should have a fundamental understanding of the principles of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Pediatric Sleeplessness: Identification and Intervention
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 5 (Lower Level)
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert W. Montgomery, Ph.D.
ROBERT W. MONTGOMERY (Reinforcement Unlimited), JASON T. CAVIN (The Learning Tree, Inc.)
Description: Pediatric sleeplessness and sleep disruptions are among the most common concerns of parents. Excessive sleepiness in a child is a symptom that is often underrecognized and misinterpreted, but when left untreated can lead to serious behavioral, academic, developmental, and medical consequences. Pediatric sleeplessness is widely prevalent and often behaviorally based. Research supports that pediatric sleeplessness can be treated effectively with nonpharmacologic interventions. This workshop will review the nature of sleep and sleep disruption (including common pediatric sleep disorders), and introduce the participant to behavioral treatment strategies (e.g., extinction, parent education, positive routines, sleep hygiene). Finally, behavioral interventions for children with special needs will be discussed (i.e., developmental disabilities, ADHD, and mood disorders).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Recognize the three main types of sleep disruption. - Analyze the environment, in light of the research, in order to maximize the potential for restful sleep. - Describe the most common behavioral mistakes made during sleep preparation and list research supported sleep preparation habits that increase the likelihood of productive sleep. - Have criteria for when to refer those with sleep disruption for medical evaluation.
Activities: Didactic and interactive discussion will be conducted throughout the session. Participants are encouraged to come with questions and case examples as an interactive session will be included.
Audience: BCBAs, BCABAs, consultants, teachers, parents, and anyone interested in how sleep impacts behavior and how to improve the sleep of children and adolescents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: BACB
Private Practice Model of Consulting
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Continental B (1st floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Terence G. Blackwell, M.A.
TERENCE G. BLACKWELL (CERG Management, Inc.), PAUL F. CONLEY (Paul Conley Publishing)
Description: The workshop is designed to teach people how to establish their own professional consulting business using a Private Practice Model. Topics include: how to identify clients, pricing of services, leveraging your time, building your business through centers of influence, creating a public presence and getting beyond creating a income, to designing a lifestyle.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will understand: - Defining your niche market - Determining the structure of a Private Practice - Creating a public presence - Assessing the viability of your business
Activities: Analyzing behaviors that lead to successful business models for Private Practitioners; behavior of successful marketing of services; Business Model review, case study of successful independent Private Practice Models.
Audience: Individuals interested in establishing Private Practice model consulting business in the field of ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Use of Computer and Video Technology with Children with Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Joliet (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (The Genesis School), MICHELE LEYKUM (The Genesis School), ERIN SPARACIO (The Genesis School)
Description: Often children with autism have great difficulty learning new skills, and one factor that often impedes learning by children with autism is the social component of the learning process. The use of video-based intstruction has been successful in teaching a variety of new skills. This workshop will provide information on a variety of video-based instructional methods that can be used successfully to teach skills to children with autism. Specific methods to be reviewed will include: video modeling, video rehearsal, video priming. In addition to video-based instruction, computer-based instruction and a combination of the use of video and computer technology will also be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe at least 3 video-based instructional methods that can be used with children with autism - Describe at least 2 uses of video modeling with children with autism. - Explain how reinforcement contingencies can be used through video contingencies - Provide a rationale for using computer or video technology for children with autism
Activities: Participants will observe video clips depicting a variety of video-based instructional techniques. Participants will be asked to select a behavior that they would like to increase using video-based instruction and will work on developing a plan to use video-based instruction to teach a skill. Volunteers will also have an opportunity to sample computer-based technology programs.
Audience: Special educators, psychologists, school personnel, behavior analysts and parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Communication-Based Behavior Interventions
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Continental C (1st floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John J. Pokrzywinski, M.A.
JOHN J. POKRZYWINSKI (Arlington Developmental Center), DIANA BRADBERRY (Arlington Developmental Center), RICHARD W. POWELL (Shelby Residential and Vocational Services), IRFA KARMALI (Shelby Residential and Vocational Services)
Description: This workshop emphasizes positive reinforcement of alternative behaviors to reduce problem behaviors (replacement behaviors). It encourages procedures that increase the contextual fit of behavior support plans; presents procedures that allow identification and manipulation of setting events and discriminative stimuli; Discussion includes procedures to encourage a communication-based environment. The procedures described in the workshop are designed to: Emphasize nonaversive and naturalistic procedures to reduce the likelihood of problem behaviors; increase the acceptance of behavior support plans, and thus the likelihood of success and generality; and increase collaboration between professional and direct-support staff.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify and discuss procedures to reduce problem behaviors by emphasizing positive reinforcement of alternative behaviors (replacement behaviors). - Identify and discuss procedures to modify antecedent & setting event manipulations which reduce the occurrence of problem behaviors and the need for corrective interventions. - Identify and discuss procedures that increase the acceptability of behavior support plans and increase the likelihood of success and generality (contextual fit). - Describe and discuss procedures to encourage a communicative environment. - Describe and discuss procedures to increase collaboration between all team members and direct-support staff.
Activities: Workshop activities include discussions of Eliminative versus educative strategies to deal with problem behaviors; Antecedent events & contextual variables; Functional behavior assessment & replacement behavior development; Discrete trial training (DTT) and natural environment training (NET); Verbal behavior considerations.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, Speech-Language Pathologists, Direct-Support Staff & Supervisors, Psychologists, Nurses, Advocates, Independent Support Coordinators, and others.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: BACB
Graphing with Microsoft Excel
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4C (4th floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly A. Schulze, Ph.D.
SARAH E. ROBERTS (Minnesota Autism Center), KIMBERLY A. SCHULZE (St. Cloud State University), EMILY RUDRUD (St. Cloud State University), ERIC RUDRUD (St. Cloud State University)
Description: articipants will be provided with systematic instruction on graphing single-subject research designs with Microsoft Excel. Single-subject designs covered include: ABAB, Multiple Baseline, Alternating Treatments, and Cumulative Records. Participants will also learn to graph session-by-session learner acquisition data. Participants will be provided with a CD providing detailed text instructions, a streaming video with demonstrations, and templates for learner acquisition data.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Enter data on Excel spreadsheet for appropriate single-subject research design. - Graph data for single-subject design. - Edit graph content (titles, axis, background, condition, trend lines). - Graph learner acquisition data.
Activities: Participants will be provided with instruction and practice in graphing single-case designs. We encourage participants to bring laptop computers to practice entering data and graphing results.
Audience: Practitioners and researchers who need to graph data in an efficient manner. Faculty and graduate students who teach behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: BACB
Introduction to Data Collection Methods
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Boulevard B (2nd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bobby Newman, Ph.D.
BOBBY NEWMAN (Room to Grow), TAMMY HAMMOND NATOF (Effective Interventions)
Description: Too often, individuals who are attempting to apply behavior analytic instruction have not been trained in the usage of a full range of data collection methodologies. They have one or two particular systems that are in use at their program (e.g., percent correct or frequency), but avoid the use of a myriad of other data collection strategies (e.g., fluency, latency, probe data, etc.). This is an introductory level workshop that will describe various systems of data collection commonly used within Applied Behavior Analytic settings (e.g., intensive programs for individuals diagnosed with developmental disabilities, mainstream educational settings, adult rehabilitation programs). Various systems of data collection in applied settings will be introduced and explored. These will include: frequency data, rate measures, latency, magnitude, duration, percent correct (in a trial by trial format), and probe data. In addition, specific data sampling techniques such as Partial Interval Recording and Momentary Time Sampling will be discussed. How and when to use each of the above will be discussed, and practice will be provided from videotaped and audio examples. A pop quiz of given scenarios will also be provided, and participants encouraged to discuss which data collection system they would employ for each scenario and why.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will (be able to): - Learn the definitions of each of the several types of data collection listed above - Learn how to use each type of data collection. - Learn when to use each type of data collection. - Practice systems of deriving inter-observer agreement - Teach others data collection strategies.
Activities: Participants will hear lecture and will partake in practice in the various types of data collection described.
Audience: This is an introductory level workshop for parents and direct care providers, as well as staff trainers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Preference-Based Teaching: Procedures for Helping People with Developmental Disabilities Enjoy Learning Without Problem Behavior
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Waldorf (3rd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Dennis H. Reid, Ph.D.
DENNIS H. REID (Carolina Behavior Analysis and Support Center), CAROLYN W. GREEN (J. Iverson Riddle Developmental Center)
Description: This workshop will describe a preference-based teaching approach for helping people with developmental disabilities enjoy learning functional skills without problem behavior during teaching sessions. The focus is on how to make teaching programs highly preferred (as indicated, for example, through indices of happiness and absence of indices of unhappiness). A program approach will be described and demonstrated that: (a) enhances the preferred nature of teaching programs to increase learner enjoyment in participating in the programs, and (b) removes the motivation for problem behavior that often occurs in attempts to escape or avoid the programs. Specific strategies to be described include how a teacher or instructor can build rapport with a learner and establish his/her attention as a reinforcer, using preferred events as antecedents and consequences to teaching sessions, interspersing preferred events within instructional trials, incorporating efficient choice opportunities within the teaching process, and timing the scheduling of teaching sessions to promote learner enjoyment. Summaries of recent behavior analytic investigations will also be provided to demonstrate the evidence base of preference-based teaching.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe how to include a preferred event before, during and after a teaching session to enhance the preferred features of the session for a learner with disabilities. - Describe how to use establishing operations to maximize the preferred nature of at least one aspect of a teaching session. - Describe how at least one learner choice can be embedded within a teaching session to enhance the preferred nature of the session for a learner. - Describe three things a teacher can do to establish his/her attention as a preferred event for a learner.
Activities: Activities of participants will include: (1) listening to instructor lecture/presentations, (2) viewing overhead presentation of key points, (3) completing pencil and paper activities relating to scenarios depicting applications of key points, (4) viewing role-play demonstrations of target procedures by instructors, (5) practicing target procedures in role-play situations with performance feedback by instructors (provided until individual participants demonstrate competency in accordance with performance checklists employed by instructors) , and (6) opportunities to ask questions of instructors and receive instructor answers.
Audience: The target audience includes anyone who implements skill-acquisition teaching programs with people who have developmental disabilities including autism. Examples of target audience participants include teachers, teacher assistants, residential direct support and supervisory staff, vocational support staff (e.g., job coaches), behavior analysts, behavior specialists and technicians, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: BACB
The Teaching of Successful Intelligence
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford C (3rd floor)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: T. V. Joe Layng, Ph.D.
JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy), T. V. JOE LAYNG (Headsprout)
Description: When the environment requires a learner to produce verbal stimuli that sequentially and systematically make one pattern of behavior more likely than another in order to meet a contingency requirement, reasoning is defined. This process is akin to what Skinner (1969) described as an "inspection of reinforcement contingencies" such that an individual can describe behavior that meets contingency requirements without direct shaping or rules. Procedures have been developed that train learners in reasoning and in the inspection of the requirements for reinforcement in most problem solving situations. The workshop will begin with a brief introduction to approaches to teaching intelligence, including Sternbergs analytical, practical, and creative intelligences, and an overview of effective and ineffective thinking skills strategies. The body of the workshop will be spent actively applying a Talk Aloud Problem Solving (TAPS) method derived from Bloom, 1950, and Whimbey & Lockhead, 1999) for teaching effective reasoning, and a method of teaching analytical thinking, Fluent Thinking Skills (FTS), (Robbins and Layng, 2004) based upon generating and answering questions that can be used for elementary school through graduate school and for effectively solving everyday problems at home and in the workplace.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Define and distinguish between reasoning and analytical thinking. - Describe the relation between reasoning, analytical thinking, and intelligence - Apply TAPS and FTS to a variety of situations requiring reasoning or analytical thinking. - Describe how to teach TAPS and FTS to others.
Activities: Discuss reasoning and analytical thinking as described in workshop introduction; Play TAPS game to learn basic concepts; In groups of two, Apply TAPS to solve problems with one person taking the role of problem solver and the other the role of active listener. Both individuals will take turns as problem solver and active listeners; Play FTS game to learn basic concepts, Apply FTS to quickly learn a difficult subject unfamiliar to most participants.
Audience: Those who work in educational, therapeutic, or business settings where reasoning, thinking or the teaching of intelligence is important.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Behavior Systems Technology in Teacher Education Programming: Principles, Practice, and Hands-On Applications
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4D (4th floor)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), DANIEL W. BALDERSON (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)
Description: The workshop will provide introduction to, and hands on application of, a data supported protocol for the (a) comprehensive description, (b) discrete and sequential analysis, and (c) feedback and goal-setting activities necessary to effective teacher training in postsecondary classroom and on-site K-12 deliberate practice environments. Workshop activities include (a) introduction to the importance of a behavior systems approach to teacher training, (b) hands-on observation system construction, and (c) simulated data collection and analysis activities designed for instructional purposes. Additionally, detailed explanation and hands-on interaction with protocols designed for a range of logically sequenced training activities are provided, including (a) classroom video observations, (b) on-site data-based assessment and immediate feedback and goal-setting, and (c) research and development into effective educational practice. Workshop participants will leave with a conceptual and applied familiarity with behavior systems educational protocols designed for effective professional training practice. Participants will be provided with a complimentary copy of the complete software tools and methods procedures on CD ROM, and MSWORD files of all necessary illustration materials in relation to the educational protocols discussed as a function of workshop participation. *While some computer hardware will be provided, it is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop hardware to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will exit with technologically-based instructional skills in the area of applied behavioral teacher training. Skills include the ability to (a) design observation systems that match with training objectives, (b) construct video-based observational learning laboratory experiences in relation to training objectives, (c) implement on-site data-based feedback and goal-setting experiences to determine if training objectives have been met, and (d) develop a set of applied research activities to document the relative effectiveness of professional training activities. At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Discuss in conceptual and applied ways the principles and practice of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional teacher training. - Construct observation systems relevant to their particular professional teacher training objectives. - Design and implement video-based observational learning activities in relation to educational objectives for professionals in training. - Understand and apply a range of computer-based data collection and analysis techniques in relation to recommended data-based on-site feedback and goal setting instructional protocols. - Develop an applied research agenda in relation to professional training objectives to determine the relative effectiveness of instructional efforts.
Activities: Activities include review of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional training activities; hands-on application of observation system construction designed as compatible with professional training objectives; hands-on application of observational laboratory development in relation to the classroom instruction of relevant behavior analytic professional training objectives; hands-on application of data-based on-site feedback and goal-goal setting protocols in relationship to deliberate practice activities of professional trainees; and introduction and review of recommended research activity development in relation to determining the relative effectiveness of recommended professional training activities.
Audience: Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in the area of professional teacher education in specific, and in the area of postsecondary training for professional competencies in general. Those working in postsecondary educational settings where focus is on the education, on-site training, and assessment of professional practice competencies, and who are challenged with how to teach, describe, and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary materials particularly appealing to a wide range of professional training, assessment, and applied research applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Performance Management in Service Delivery for Children with Autism: Measuring and Attaining Exemplary Staff Performance
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 1 (Lower Level)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, M.A.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HOLLY ALMON (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SARA J. PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), AMY KING (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: This workshop will provide participants multiple opportunities to learn how to evaluate service delivery staff performance in three critical areas: verbal behavior about the service being delivered, contingency-shaped behavior involved in delivering the service, and verbally-mediated behavior involved in problem solving related to the service being delivered. Sample forms and feedback systems will be shown, and participants will practice evaluating staff performance via contrived practice and videotape review.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe three important repertoires to be developed in service delivery personnel. - Evaluate examples of service personnel�s performance related to verbal behavior about service. - Evaluate examples of service personnel�s performance related to contingency-shaped service behavior. - Describe at least three sample repertoire areas which relate directly to each participant�s own service delivery personnel.
Activities: Throughout this workshop, participants will: Participate in discussion about topics being addressed; complete evaluations measuring service delivery personnel verbal behavior; complete evaluations measuring service delivery personnel contingency-shaped behavior through the review of multiple videotaped examples; complete evaluations measuring service delivery personnel verbally-mediated behavior using real life sample performance data; and begin to develop instruments to measure each of the above in the work each participant supervises or performs in their professional life.
Audience: People supervising the performance of staff members delivering services to persons with disabilities. Individuals supervising and designing instructional or skill-building programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Re-evaluating Practice, the Big Picture, or Why We Really Do What We Do
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Private Dining Room 4 (3rd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly A. Smalley, Ph.D.
KIMBERLY A. SMALLEY (Behavior Support Consultation Advocacy)
Description: Take a few minutes and remember why we are in this, what our objectives are, and what our output should achieve. This workshop will present lively discussion around the greater context in which we work, peoples lives. With specific regard to individuals with developmental disabilities and challenging behavior we will task analyze our practice to assure that our interventions are socially valid, acceptable, and result in real beneficial quality of life change. Working backwards from where we want to be (LROP) using crowding out, manipulating molar variable to acquire a "goodness of fit" and teaching to strengths, how do we get from here to there? Discussion will hopefully include facilitating contrived and natural networks of support, enriched environments, communication, pivotal skill building, gainful employment, and sex.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Be able to discuss and plan for social validity and acceptability of interventions in schools and families. - Generate practical examples of manipulating molar variables, 'Crowding out", teaching incompatible and or alternative behaviors, that have practical meaning in a consumers life. - Self assess outcomes of behavioral practice and long-term implications for the folks you serve. - Conduct informal ecological assessments (such as circles of support or other social density tools) around the soft and fuzzy components of life (Recreation and leisure skills /friends/ relationships).
Activities: Brief informal self-assessment/ survey
Audience: Direct service staff who work with individuals with developmental disabilities (such as individuals with MR/DD ASD), those who design and implement behavior support plans, Teachers, families, consumers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Strategies for Successful Inclusion Programming in a Public School Setting
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 2 (Lower Level)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.S.
KERRIE M. OTIPOBY (Marlborough Public Schools), JACKIE M. WARD (Marlborough Public Schools), BENJAMIN R. BRUNEAU (Marlborough Public Schools), CARRIE ROBBINS (Marlborough Public Schools), JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Marlborough Public Schools), AMANDA J. SPITZER (Marlborough Public Schools), JENNIFER TERAKEDIS (Marlborough Public Schools), ALISON L. MOORS (Marlborough Public Schools)
Description: As a result of the trend toward inclusion in general education settings, many public schools are faced with the task of developing programming for students on the autism spectrum. Many strategies based on the principles of applied behavior analysis, however, have been more likely to occur in more restrictive settings. Specific guidelines and strategies are limited for successful inclusion. Furthermore, the majority of data-based strategies to promote successful inclusion have been conducted in primarily pre-school settings. This workshop will focus on data-based strategies to successfully include pre-school, elementary, and middle school students on the autism spectrum in general education settings. In addition, strategies for teaching social and age-appropriate leisure skills will be discussed, including social skills groups, social coaching, reverse inclusion strategies, and methods to teach appropriate play skills. Participants will acquire the skills necessary to develop high-quality data-based inclusion programming, including: 1. How to determine which skills to address in inclusion settings; 2. Identification of appropriate inclusion opportunities; 3. Education for general educators; 4. Data collection systems for educational objectives; 5. Development of data systems to determine for individual students the amount and type of support required and data-based strategies to fade staff support; 6. Strategies to fade support; 7. Reinforcement system strategies for inclusion settings; 8. When and how to provide modified academic instruction; 9. Social skills training program will be reviewed, including strategies for the development of assessments, teaching programs, and strategies for generalization; 10. Strategies of teaching appropriate per interaction and play skills. Participants are encouraged to bring actual student profiles to use in exercises.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify key considerations in the development of high-quality data-based inclusion - Develop data systems to determine for individual students the amount and type of support required - Identify data-based strategies to fade staff support. - Identify strategies for the development of social skills assessments and teaching programs
Activities: Didactic instruction; Discuss and develop a list of essential data; Develop a plan for collecting data on educational objectives.
Audience: Behavior analysts and teachers working with students on the autism spectrum
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Instructional Design for Students with Special Needs: Identifying Critical/Variable Attributes for Effective Programming
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 3 (Lower Level)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Alison L. Moors, M.A.
ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KELLY J. FERRIS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HOLLY ALMON (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), LESLEY LUCAS-PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: Once teachers have established scope and sequences from students Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or assessment reports, they must still create a plan for how they will break up the skills into teachable units. To divide each skill into teachable units, teachers must (1) identify the critical and variable attributes of instructional stimuli and (2) plan for cumulative programming within the instruction. This workshop will help teachers identify critical and variable features to better design appropriate instructional sequences and plan systematically for ongoing cumulative review necessary to facilitate student learning and skill retention of what they have learned thus far within any given instructional sequence.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify critical and variable attributes of instruction. - Identify the boundaries of critical attributes. - Design instructional sequences based on the identified critical features. - Plan for cumulative programming within instruction. - Learn to Fast Cycle through the designed sequence based on students performance.
Activities: Group and individual practice discrimination critical from variable attributes; Individual practice outlining critical attributes of a skill; Practice writing instructional sequences; Writing instructional sequences with cumulative programming; Drawing Fast Cycle tracks on instructional sequences based on data based decisions.
Audience: Professionals whose job descriptions include program/instructional design for students with special needs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Students with Autism to Respond to Threatening Social Situations in Mainstream Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 4 (Lower Level)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Lori E. Bechner, M.A.
LORI E. BECHNER (Alpine Learning Group), JULIA R. FISHER (Alpine Learning Group), CAREN GANS (Alpine Learning Group), ALEXANDRA HOLBERTON (EPIC School)
Description: Children with autism who are included in mainstream settings may encounter threatening social situations such as teasing, name calling, bullying, and being told to do inappropriate things for the humor of others. Without the skills needed to respond appropriately in these threatening social situations, individuals with autism in mainstream settings are often at risk for being taken advantage of which can result in physical and emotional harm, as well as result in limited social relationships with peers. Research in training self-protection skills has concentrated on teaching typically developing children to respond when presented with physically harmful situations. Research in teaching self-protection skills to individuals with developmental disabilities, although limited, has also focused on teaching individuals to respond when presented with physically harmful situations. There is, however, little research focused on teaching individuals with developmental disabilities to respond to threatening social situations. This workshop will describe potentially threatening social situations, and discuss strategies to teach students with autism to respond to such situations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe threatening social situations which may be encountered by children with autism in mainstream settings - List and describe strategies to teach students with autism to respond to threatening social situations - Understand and discuss use of video review and peer procedures - Review and explain sample curricula to teach applicable self protection skills.
Activities: Didactic presentation, discussion, video, sample curricula.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, educators, other clinicians working with children with autism, graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing and Implementing Effective, Accurate and Comprehensive Behavior Intervention Plans
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4B (4th floor)
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jose D. Rios, M.S.
JOSE D. RIOS (CalABA Past President), EVANGELINA HURTADO (Therapeutic Pathways), JOHN YOUNGBAUER (North Los Angeles County Regional Center)
Description: Effective intervention requires well-defined description of procedures, plans must be clinically accurate and they must be implemented with integrity. Support staff and teachers can best assist individuals with problem behaviors when they have the guidance of a well-designed and effective intervention plan. Unfortunately, behavior plans for persons with developmental disabilities are often poorly designed- they often lack clinical accuracy for the individuals specific behavior problems and are often difficult to implement. This workshop will address plans that are clinically challenged and review problems and the necessary steps needed to remedy them. Beginning with the importance of an accurate functional assessment, this workshop will review how to design plans in residential and educational settings. We will discuss and critique poorly designed plans and describe common problems that we have encountered in these plans. The workshop also will address staffs concerns and barriers in the implementation of treatment plans and will also provide some steps to remedy these problems.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Better evaluate treatment intervention plans for individuals with behavior problems. These guidelines include how to define procedures effectively, implement clinical accuracy, and treatment integrity. - Use the Rights to Effective Treatment when designing plans and understand how they apply to treatment design and implementation. - Address environmental factors that affect the accurate implementation of treatment plans in residential facilities and educational settings. Participants will learn helpful tips used in consulting with staff and supervisors to improve the effectiveness of treatment plan implementation. - To recognize common problems found in poorly designed behavior plans and to correct such problems when they occur.
Activities: This workshop will be primarily didactic with a review of some handouts and checklists.
Audience: This presentation is geared for individuals who are or will soon be designing, evaluating or implementing functional assessment and intervention plans. The primary focus is the use of behavior plans within residential settings although examples involved in educational settings also will be addressed.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: BACB
Talk the Talk, Walk the Walk: A Training Model for Behavior Analysts to Teach Theory and Clinical Skills to Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lake Erie (8th floor)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Justin A. DiDomenico, M.S.
JUSTIN A. DIDOMENICO (Partners in Learning), KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners in Learning), LAURA KENNEALLY (Partners in Learning), LORI A. LORENZETTI (Partners in Learning)
Description: Developing competencies in Applied Behavior Analysis requires a mastery of both theory and application. Successful Behavior Analysts require both an in depth knowledge of theory and the ability to apply the skills in clinical and school settings. This workshop is designed for trainers to teach the competencies of ABA to teachers, paraprofessionals and other clinical staff to master both theory and demonstrate core clinical skills required to enact IEP goals. Participants will be able to identify core competencies in theory and train staff to display these skills to mastery in applied settings. Trainers will receive a manual and DVD with video models and training modules.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned (about): - The key components of theory required to train teachers and paraprofessionals. This includes paper and pencil mastery exams. - How to teach and measure clinical skills in applied settings. - How to develop skills to measure the staff�s skill acquisition of clinical skills. - create a program to motivate and monitor the staff�s skill acquisition. - To create and design individual core competencies for each staff member tailored to their skill level of both mastery of theory and application. - How to create and maintain home programs to ensure generalization of skills across settings.
Activities: Using lecture, video demonstrations, handouts and discussion, participants will learn the key training protocols for staff to effectively implement ABA based IEP goals.
Audience: This workshop is designed for Behavior Analysts who train teachers and paraprofessionals who work with children with autism. This will help teach the staff to understand and demonstrate the core competencies of Applied Behavior Analysis in order to be effective practitioners.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W75
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Application of ABA to Learning Disabilities: Strategies for Reading Acquisition and Motivation
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lake Huron (8th floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sara White, M.A.
JENNIFER M. GILLIS MATTSON (State University of New York, Binghamton), SARA WHITE (State University of New York, Binghamton), RAYMOND G. ROMANCZYK (Institute for Child Development)
Description: Approximately 5% of children have a learning disability, including reading disorders. Recent research suggests that children who have a reading disability have impaired phonemic awareness and decoding skills, which are necessary skills for beginning reading. Research also suggests that individuals with learning disabilities have deficits in social skills. This workshop will primarily cover reading disabilities, but will also provide information and strategies for improving students social behavior. The first part of the workshop will provide an overview of the current research on reading interventions. A short-term, intensive, after school reading clinic model that utilizes the framework of ABA for both reading instruction and improving social behavior will be described. Topics will focus on implementing a behavioral assessment specifically designed for reading, selecting individualized reading goals for children, implementation of token economy systems within a reading program, and data collection and analysis strategies to assist with monitoring student progress. This workshop will also review a unique software program to assist teachers, parents, or other professionals, with material selection and construction. This software program contains letters, phonemes, blends, diphthongs, digraphs, nonsense words, and grade-level sigh vocabulary words that are printable in flashcard formats. The software was initially developed in 2000 and refined over the past four years.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned (about): - The current research on interventions for reading disabilities. - An individualized goal selection procedure that includes how to use standardized assessment data and behavioral assessments to select appropriate goals for reading (all levels). - Effective teaching methods for reading instruction within an ABA framework. - Motivational strategies that may be effectively implemented for individuals with reading disabilities. - A database that contains letters, phonemes, blends, diphthongs, digraphs, nonsense words, and grade-level SV words. The database will allow participants to print out flashcards for teaching. - Reading curricula and receive a goal sequence for reading instruction - How to incorporate social skills training into reading interventions, as exemplified by the after school reading clinic model that will be presented.
Activities: 1. Lecture on current research on interventions for reading disabilities; 2. Lecture on individualized goal selection; 3. Group exercise on developing goals from standardized and behavioral assessment; 4. Lecture on behavior analytic teaching strategies as applied to reading disabilities; 5. Overview of software for instructional material development; 6. Lecture on appropriate curricula for students with learning disabilities; 7. Group exercise on the use of reading curricula; 8. Group exercise on incorporating social skills development into instruction for students with learning disabilities.
Audience: This workshop is designed for teachers, parents, and professionals and paraprofessionals providing reading instruction to students (Kindergarten through 6th grade level)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Model for Supporting Individuals with Severe Dysfunctional Behaviors in Community Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lake Michigan (8th floor)
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Stephen C. Luce, Ph.D.
STEPHEN C. LUCE (Melmark), ANGELA F. SMITH (Melmark), JAMIE PAGLIARO (Melmark)
Description: Individuals who exhibit severe dysfunctional behaviors can be successfully maintained in community settings with the proper support. Five components have been identified as essential to a successful program: psychiatric consult services, a behavior support plan, staff training, communication amongst staff, and funding. This workshop will provide an overview of the staff training literature, highlighting the pyramidal model and performance feedback methods. Participants will also learn strategies to facilitate meetings with program stakeholders to identify meaningful behavioral outcomes and to conduct functional behavior assessment. Finally, the five essential components will be reviewed, and case studies will illustrate direct applications that resulted in program success.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify the five components of a successful program for maintaining individuals with severe dysfunctional behaviors in community settings. - Cite research-based staff training methods (performance feedback, pyramidal model, etc.) - Facilitate meetings with program stakeholders to identify meaningful behavioral outcomes and to conduct functional behavioral assessment. - Identify maintenance and generalization strategies to ensure long-term program success.
Activities: 1. Lecture and question/answer session on the staff training literature; 2. Practice the task-analyzed steps of facilitating effective meetings with program stakeholders to identify meaningful behavioral outcomes and to conduct functional behavioral assessment; 3. Review the five essential components of successful programming for individuals with severe dysfunctional behavior in community settings; 4. Evaluate case studies.
Audience: This workshop is geared towards program administrators, behavioral consultants and clinicians providing support to individuals with severe dysfunctional behaviors in community-based settings. Participants should be familiar functional assessment procedures and the current literature on reducing dysfunctional behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W77
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Compassion and Behavior Change: Using Relationship to Enhance Acceptance Interventions for Health Related Behaviors
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Private Dining Room 3 (3rd floor)
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Gifford, Ph.D.
ELIZABETH GIFFORD (Center for Health Care Evaluation), BARBARA S. KOHLENBERG (University of Nevada School of Medicine), JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden), TOBIAS LUNDGREN (University of Uppsala, Sweden)
Description: This workshop is designed to help clinicians develop usable skills in relational and acceptance-oriented behavior therapies. Specifically, we will focus on using corrective experiences within the treatment session to facilitate client awareness, acceptance, cognitive and behavioral flexibility, and personal fulfillment. Participants will learn skills from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy. The workshop will focus on health related behaviors, including addiction treatment and behavioral medicine.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned (about): - Acceptance based interventions for health related behaviors, including addiction, epilepsy, and smoking. - The therapeutic relationship in treatment for medically relevant disorders. - How to maximize the potential of acceptance based interventions through relationship processes. - Enhancing the development of competence in functional analysis through supervision.
Activities: Participants will view tapes, engage in discussion and exercises, and listen to presentation of didactic material.
Audience: Practitioners interested in enhancing their therapeutic relationships, and improving skills in acceptance based interventions for health related behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W78
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The ABC's of Consulting in School Districts
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Astoria (3rd floor)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kristen M. Villone, Ph.D.
KRISTEN M. VILLONE (Melmark), NOELLE M. GREEN (Bancroft NeuroHealth)
Description: One of the biggest challenges behavior analysts face when consulting in school districts is balancing the role of "invited guest" with the role of "professional with expertise." Consultants working in school districts may also be challenged more by the behavior of the service providers than that of the identified student(s). The experiences of a veteran consultant (with 16 years consulting experience) and a relatively new consultant (with 9 years clinical experience) will offer unique perspectives on strategies and approaches they have found invaluable.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe common types of services most often requested by school districts. - Identify/address the primary "client" and/or presenting problem(s). - Understand the importance of body language, staff perceptions, documentation, and communication during classroom observations. - Have a better sense of a consultant's role (and how to establish boundaries). - Learn common mistakes made by consultants and how to avoid them. - Obtain a "blueprint" of how to set up/conduct classroom observations. - Obtain a "blueprint" of the veteran consultant's basic ABA training seminar. - Learn strategies that build teamwork and motivate staff when you're a "visitor" in their "home." - Have a better understanding of the interpersonal dynamics and contingencies in school districts. - Develop a better understanding of how to address ethical issues which may arise during consultations.
Activities: Participants will receive handouts to aid reviewing the workshop�s learning objectives during the first part of the workshop. The second part of the workshop will consist of a problem-solving discussion of different types of obstacles, scenarios and case examples the presenters have experienced. As time permits, audience members will be encouraged to present their own obstacles/issues for problem-solving.
Audience: Anyone interested in consulting in school districts, especially relatively new consultants who have ABA experience teaching children with developmental disabilities and training staff in clinical settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W79
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
An In-Depth Look at Prompting and Other Strategies for Teaching Cognitive Skills to Children with Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lake Ontario (8th floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John McEachin, Ph.D.
JOHN MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership), DORIS SOLUAGA (Autism Partnership)
Description: To obtain best outcomes for children with autism it is necessary to identify and develop teaching strategies that enable children with profound learning difficulties to master a body of knowledge that comes easily to typically developing children. Prompting and systematic prompt fading are among the most widely used strategies for enabling children with autism to learn important concepts. There are a number of different methods of selecting prompts and planning for the reduction of prompts which have been demonstrated to be effective. Unfortunately, in the research literature there are very few head-to-head comparisons of various prompting strategies. There is, however, a clearly defined body of knowledge that provides us with general principles from which a systematic, but flexible approach can be derived which serves as a sensible starting point for developing teaching strategies. This workshop will describe the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches in widespread use and to provide a conceptual framework for understanding what we are actually doing when we use prompts. We will look at prompts that occur prior to the SD, simultaneously with the SD, and after a delay. We will also discuss strategies for teaching concepts that do not rely on prompts as traditionally conceptualized, but rather rely on arranging a sequence of learning tasks that lead the student to discovery of the the concept being taught.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Recognize important differences between simple discriminations and conditional discriminations and select appropriate teaching strategies accordingly. - Identify advantages and disadvantages of pure trial and error learning vs. errorless learning and considerations for deciding what point to aim for along the high error - low error continuum. - Identify the main sources of possible inadvertent prompts that need to be controlled when conducting discrete trial teaching and methods for eliminating them. - Choose prompting strategies that not only facilitate correct responding, but lead the student to meaningful understanding of the concept being taught.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, video, role play
Audience: Individuals who use discrete trial teaching to increase cognitive skills of children with autism and related disorders and those who provide supervision and training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W80
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Relaxation: Training and Scale
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Private Dining Room 2 (3rd floor)
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Victoria Stout Kubal, M.S.
VICTORIA STOUT KUBAL (Independent provider), VANESSA STOUT HUAMAN (Loyola Center for Health and Fitness, Loyola Medical Hospital)
Description: Relaxation techniques are an integral part of the successful treatment of those exhibiting anxiety-related, pain-related, and/or anger-related behaviors. The sooner a client learns relaxation and other types of self-control techniques, the safer his/her internal and external environments may become. In addition, due to limitations in funding, providers must often demonstrate that extensive treatment progress has been made within a relatively short period of time. Poppens (1998) Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) is an assessment tool for measuring the progress of an individual demonstrating the 10 overt relaxed behaviors taught to criterion with Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT). BRT can be an effective part of treatment for individuals with emotional/mental disorders, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, physical limitations, and/or restricted cognitive/intellectual capabilities. This workshop will provide an opportunity to experience Poppens (1998) Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT) by means of labeling, modeling, imitation, practice, and corrective feedback. Once workshop participants are proficient in demonstrating URT and can verbally describe these 10 relaxed behaviors and corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors, then they will be taught assessment of URT using the BRS. Finally, participants will learn how to calculate inter-rater reliability of the BRS across observers as well as between participant and instructor.
Learning Objectives: By the end of the workshop, each participant will be able to: - Position his/her own body in alignment with the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT). - Write a description of each of the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT in his/her own words and provide corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors. - Give another individual appropriate feedback so that the other individual can correct himself/herself according to the 10 URT postures. - Observe, record, and assess another individual�s performance of the 10 relaxed behaviors from URT by accurately using the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS). - Accurately calculate BRS inter-rater reliability across participant observers and also between participant and instructor. - Compare and graph BRS inter-rater reliability scores.
Activities: Verbal Behavior: Listen to a presentation regarding the physiological effects of relaxation, the history of using relaxation training to treat psychological disorders, and Poppen�s development of Behavioral Relaxation Training and the Behavioral Relaxation Scale. Labeling and Modeling: View a live demonstration of the 10 postures included in Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT). Each relaxed posture will be labeled, described topographically, and demonstrated physically. Modeling and Imitation: Learn how to breathe diaphragmatically, then imitate the other 9 relaxed behaviors of URT while viewing an instructor as model. After each participant has proficiently demonstrated each posture separately, he/she will practice relaxing all 10 areas at the same time. Feedback: Practice silently while the instructors are giving each individual corrective feedback. Later, workshop participants will form pairs and alternate practicing URT and giving each other corrective feedback. Criterion Tests: Take URT Written Criterion Test; score one another�s criterion tests; repeat URT Written Criterion Test. Take BRS Written Criterion Test; score one another�s criterion tests; repeat BRS Written Criterion Test. Assessment: Behavioral Relaxation Scale scoring methodology will be explained and demonstrated. All observers will simultaneously score the model. The instructor will score BRS along with the workshop participants. Reliability: Calculate inter-rater reliability scores.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is comprised of BCBAs and BCABAs who work with the following populations: clients with anxiety disorders, pain-related difficulties, or anger management problems; individuals with traumatic brain injury; persons exhibiting hyperactive or repetitive behaviors; clients exhibiting schizophrenic behaviors; and persons who experience an extreme amount of stress. Professionals with a strong interest in Behavioral Medicine, Clinical Behavior Analysis, Family and Child Therapy, and/or Health and Fitness Training will also benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE