Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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11th Annual Autism Conference; San Juan, Puerto Rico; 2017

Program by Day for Wednesday, February 1, 2017


 

Special Event #3
Opening Remarks
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
8:15 AM–8:30 AM
San Juan Grand Ballroom
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (Southern Illinois University)
Opening remarks will be provided by the conference co-chairs
 
 
Invited Symposium #4
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Teaching Complex Language and Cognition to Individuals With Autism
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
8:30 AM–10:20 AM
San Juan Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (Southern Illinois University)
CE Instructor: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Decades of research in applied behavior analysis have produced a well-established technology for teaching basic verbal skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Behavior analysts often struggle with the development of instructional protocols for teaching more sophisticated verbal and cognitive skills, however. Research in the area of relational responding has inspired such protocols in recent years, such that a technology for programming for complex repertoires of generative responding is now available. This symposium will feature four prominent researchers in the areas of verbal behavior and Relational Frame Theory who will describe their ongoing research programs on complex language and cognition in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. R. Douglas Greer of the CABAS Schools will discuss the relationship between verbal and social behavior, describing specifically the role of a hierarchy of acquired reinforcers. Dr. Mark Dixon of Southern Illinois University will present research on the assessment of relational learning deficiencies in children with autism spectrum disorder and the use of standard treatment protocols for the remediation of those deficits. Ian Stewart of the National University of Ireland, Galway will discuss his research on the assessment and treatment of derived relational responding deficits as a means of promoting adaptive behavior and generative responding. Jonathan Tarbox of First Steps for Kids will share his research on the assessment and treatment of executive functioning skills, with a special focus on problem solving and flexibility.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how multiple exemplar training can be used to increase flexibility in children with ASD; (2) describe how multiple exemplar training can be used to teach problem solving skills to children with ASD; (3) descibe how verbal behavior is social behavior; (4) describe how verbal behavior developmental cusps change what can be taught and accelerate rates of learning; (5) describe how the learned or conditioned social reinforcers determine motivating conditions for being social and verbal; (6) explain why emitting the topography of social verbal behavior, as a function of a reinforcer that is not the automatic social reinforcer, is the wrong operant; (7) how building social/verbal reinforcers result in real social behaviors.
 

Assessing and Training Derived Relational Responding in Children With Autism

IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway)
Abstract:

Early intervention allows many individuals with autism to develop a generative language repertoire in which they can readily understand and produce totally novel linguistic constructions. In many other cases, individuals continue to require intensive teaching and exhibit language repertoires that are rigid or rote. Research on derived relational responding (DRR), including derived equivalence as well as other patterns (e.g., distinction, opposition, comparison, etc.), suggests that focusing on DRR can help remediate such deficits and establish and strengthen generative language and intellectual potential. Using relational frame theory (RFT) as a background, the current presentation will consider studies on equivalence and other varieties of DRR that demonstrate strong links between the capacity for DRR and linguistic and cognitive performance and that not only illustrate generativity via already established repertoires of DRR but suggest the capacity for DRR itself to be trained and the potential outcomes of doing so.

Ian Stewart received his Ph.D. from the National University of Ireland, Maynooth (NUIM) in 2001. After spending one additional year doing postdoctoral research, he was appointed to the School of Psychology at NUI Galway in August, 2002. His research focuses on the investigation of derived relational responding as a core skill underlying human language and complex behavior and he has published over 70 peer reviewed journal articles and contributed to several books and book chapters in this area. One key strand of his work has involved developing and testing procedures for assessing and training derived relational responding in children with autism and other forms of developmental delay as a means of promoting generative language and adaptive functioning.
 

Key Social Reinforcers for Social and Verbal Development

R. DOUGLAS GREER (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract:

Many of the key components for advancing verbal and social development have been identified in research, as have several protocols to establish missing development. This presentation will outline a few of these and explain how each of these is related to learned social reinforcers. Verbal behavior is social and social behavior is verbal. The foundations for social and verbal behavior consist of a hierarchy of learned reinforcers.

Dr. R. Douglas Greer is Professor of Psychology and Education at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Teachers College of Columbia University where he heads the MA and Ph.D. programs in behavior analysis and the education of students with disabilities. He has served on the editorial boards of 10 journals, published over 200 research and theoretical articles in more than 20 journals and is the author of 13 books in behavior analysis. Two of his most recent books are translated into Korean, Spanish, and Italian. Greer has sponsored 216 doctoral dissertations taught over 2,000 teachers and psychologists, originated the CABAS model of schooling used in the USA, Ireland, Italy, England and founded the Fred S. Keller School (www.cabasschools.org). He has done basic and applied experimental research in schools with students, teachers, parents, and supervisors as well as pediatric patients in medical settings. He and his colleagues have identified verbal behavior and social developmental cusps and protocols to establish them when they are missing in children. He is a recipient of the Fred S. Keller Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education from the American Psychology Association, a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, recipient of May 5 as the R. Douglas Day by Westchester County Legislators. He has served as guest professor at universities in China, Spain, Wales, England, Japan, Korea, India, Ireland, Italy, USA, and Nigeria
 

Moving Beyond Skinner's Basic Verbal Operants to Promote the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge in Persons With Autism Using Relational Frame Theory

MARK R. DIXON (Southern Illinois University)
Abstract:

Within the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA), there are a variety of specific techniques which can be utilized to improve the verbal abilities of children with autism. Until recently, most ABA treatments have been based on traditional Skinnerian approaches to language and understandings of behavior. Such ABA has accomplished fantastic things, and countless children with autism have benefited. However, more careful exploration of the types of skills targeted, the repertoire depth, and the sophistication of cognitive abilities reveal that these sorts of ABA techniques can be improved upon. Furthermore, an unexpected side effect of developing language and cognition for persons with autism is that once the children begin to close developmental gaps, the same worries, anxieties, and fears that plague their neurotypical peers start to emerge. When such a child expands their ability to think abstractly, the troubles of the world (both real and perceived) come into play. In this presentation a conceptual foundation will be discussed which suggests that the most functional account of language can be found in contemporary behavioral approaches such as relational frame theory. A series of studies will be presented which showcase how to first assess a child for relational language deficits, and then how to link the results of the assessment to standardized treatment protocols.

Dr. Mark R. Dixon, BCBA-D, is professor and coordinator of the Behavior Analysis and Therapy Program at Southern Illinois University. His interests include the study of complex operant behavior, gambling behavior, and organizational behavior. Mark has published 3 books and over 100 peer reviewed journal articles. He has served as associate editor for Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, the editor for the Analysis of Gambling Behavior, and a reviewer for over 20 nonbehavioral journals. Dr. Dixon has generated over 1.5 million dollars in funding to infuse behavior analysis within local schools and treatment facilities, and create a behavioral therapy clinic for persons suffering from problem gambling or obesity. Mark's research and/or expert opinions have been featured in Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, National Public Radio, This American Life, a New York Times best seller, and regional affiliates of ABC, CBS, and PBS.
 

Recent Research on Teaching Executive Function Skills to Children With Autism

JONATHAN J. TARBOX (FirstSteps for Kids), Lisa J. Stoddard (FirstSteps for Kids, Inc.)
Abstract:

Ample empirical research has demonstrated the effectiveness of behavioral intervention procedures for decreasing challenging behaviors and establishing relatively simple skills. Significantly less research has been published on teaching children with autism complex verbal behavior and skills referred to as "cognitive" by the general psychology and educational communities. Executive functioning is a skill domain that is documented to be delayed in many individuals with autism but has been the subject of very little skill acquisition research. This presentation proposes a radical behavioral basis for the assessment and treatment of executive function skills and presents data from recent studies on establishing problem solving skills and flexibility in children with autism.

Dr. Tarbox is the Director of Research and Regional Clinic Director at FirstSteps for Kids, in the greater Los Angeles area. Dr. Tarbox has published two books on autism treatment, as well as over 60 peer-reviewed articles and chapters in scientific texts. Dr. Tarbox is a past member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders and a current member of the editorial boards of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Behavior Analysis in Practice, Behavioral Development Bulletin, and Behavior Modification. Dr. Tarbox’s research interests include teaching complex language, social, and cognitive skills, as well as the assessment and treatment of feeding disorders and severe challenging behaviors.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #5
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Evidence for Neural Circuitry Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
San Juan Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D.
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (Southern Illinois University)
SOPHIA A. COLAMARINO (John and Maria Goldman Foundation; Stanford University School of Medicine)
Sophia Colamarino, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist with over a decade of involvement in the non-profit autism research community. She currently works in private philanthropy where she serves as the Director of the Science and Health Program for the John and Marcia Goldman Foundation, which seeks funding opportunities focused on the autism spectrum and autoimmune disease spaces. Dr. Colamarino is also a Consulting Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University Medical School and teaches a course on autism spectrum disorder in the undergraduate Human Biology Program. Prior to joining the Goldman Foundation, Dr. Colamarino served from 2004 - 2011 as the Vice President of Research for Autism Speaks and as the Science Program Director for Cure Autism Now, where she developed several important research initiatives including new efforts in neuropathology, innovative technology, and translational biology. While at Autism Speaks, Dr. Colamarino spearheaded development of a public access policy for publications resulting from the foundation's funded research, the first such policy for a US advocacy organization, for which she testified to Congress and was appointed to the NIH's National Library of Medicine advisory board for the PubMed Central science archive. She also spends much of her time providing public science lectures for the autism community and has served on many autism boards and science committees. Dr. Colamarino graduated with a BS in Biological Sciences and an AB in Psychology from Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Neurosciences from the University of California, San Francisco, where she studied brain development with neuroscientist Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Ph.D. After receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Colamarino conducted research on the genetic disorder Kallmann Syndrome at the Telethon Institute for Genetics and Medicine in Milan, Italy, led by human geneticist Andrea Ballabio, MD. She then returned to the US to work at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, CA, studying adult neural stem cells and brain regeneration in the laboratory of stem cell pioneer Fred H. Gage, Ph.D.
Abstract: Despite the striking behaviors that encompass autism, one of the most perplexing things from a neurobiological standpoint is that, at first pass, the brain structurally looks relatively normal. For decades researchers have been trying to pinpoint where autism is located in the brain, usually focusing on individual brain structures. However, no single region has so far been shown to underlie all of autism's symptoms. This lecture will provide a brief review of the emerging and converging evidence that autism is a disorder involving neural connectivity, where changes in the structure/function of brain connectivity may disrupt the ability to process information across different brain regions. Finally, these changes might be more widespread than would be predicted from the discrete domains of behavioral symptomatology.
Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) name the basic structures that form the brain's neural circuitry; (2) describe the concept of the Functional Underconnectivity Theory of autism; (3) describe at least two pieces of research data supporting the idea that individuals with autism have differences in their neural circuitry.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #6
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA

The Concept of Automatic Reinforcement: Implications for Assessment and Intervention

Wednesday, February 1, 2017
1:30 PM–2:20 PM
San Juan Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Timothy R. Vollmer, Ph.D.
Chair: Wayne W. Fisher (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
TIMOTHY R. VOLLMER (University of Florida)
Timothy R. Vollmer received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1992. From 1992 until 1996 he was on the psychology faculty at Louisiana State University. From 1996 to 1998 he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He returned to the University of Florida in 1998 and is now a Professor of Psychology. His primary area of research is applied behavior analysis, with emphases in developmental disabilities, autism, reinforcement schedules, and parenting. He has published over 140 articles and book chapters related to behavior analysis. He is an ABAI fellow, he was the recipient of the 1996 B. F. Skinner New Researcher award from the American Psychological Association (APA), and received another APA award in August, 2004, for significant contributions to applied behavior analysis. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis from 2014-2016.
Abstract:

A great deal of emphasis has been placed on socially mediated reinforcement contingencies maintaining problem behavior displayed by individuals with autism spectrum disorders and related disabilities. However, there is strong evidence that some problem behavior occurs and maintains in the absence of social reinforcement contingencies. In fact, most repetitive stereotypies appear to be maintained in the absence of social reinforcement. To the extent such behavior is operant, and to the extent it is not socially reinforced, it is maintained by automatic reinforcement. The presenter will review origins and historical usage of the term "automatic reinforcement," scientific implications of the concept, and clinical implications for behavioral assessment and treatment. He will also present research from his applied laboratories, including published studies and work in progress.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define “automatic reinforcement;” (2) list at least two possible interventions for dangerous behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement; (3) identify functional analysis outcomes indicating that behavior is maintained by automatic reinforcement; (4) describe the historical usage of “automatic reinforcement” in the field of behavior analysis; (5) identify at least one possible future direction for behavior analytic research on automatic reinforcement.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #7
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Effective Strategies for Promoting Complex Social Play in Children With Autism
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
1:30 PM–2:20 PM
Miramar Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Thomas S. Higbee, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica Akers (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
THOMAS S. HIGBEE (Utah State University)
Dr. Thomas S. Higbee is a Professor of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University and Director of the Autism Support Services: Education, Research, and Training (ASSERT) program, an early intensive behavioral intervention program for children with autism that he founded in 2003. He is a doctoral-level Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D) and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in the state of Utah. His research focuses on the development of effective educational and behavioral interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders and related disabilities as well as the development of effective training strategies for teaching parents and professionals to implement effective interventions. He is a former associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and a current associate editor for the European Journal of Behavior Analysis and the International Journal of Behavior Analysis and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Dr. Higbee is committed to the dissemination of effective behavioral interventions and has helped to create intensive behavior analytic preschool and school programs for children with autism and related disorders in Brazil, Russia, Portugal, and throughout his home state of Utah. He is the past president of the Utah Association for Behavior Analysis (UtABA) and currently serves as a member of the Practice Board of the Association for Behavior Analysis International and the Psychologist Licensing Board of the state of Utah.
Abstract: Play serves an important function in the lives of young children. Through play, children learn about the world around them and come to understand the social rules and conventions that define the human experience. Many young children with autism spectrum disorders, however, do not develop the skills necessary to play appropriately with other children or even when alone. Over the past several years, behavioral researchers have developed support strategies to teach young children with autism to play using a visual cuing system called photographic activity schedules, in combination with social scripting and script fading. In the current presentation, strategies for using activity schedules and script fading to promote both independent and complex social play will be described and discussed. Recent research illustrating the effective use of activity schedules and script fading to promote complex social play between children with autism and their typically developing peers will also be presented and discussed.
Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss evidence-based strategies for promoting play in young children with autism; (2) discuss evidence-based strategies for promoting social skills in young children with autism; (3) use evidence-based strategies to teach play and social behavior to their children/clients.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #8
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA

Improving the Efficacy and Practicality of Functional Communication Training

Wednesday, February 1, 2017
2:30 PM–3:20 PM
San Juan Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Brian D. Greer, Ph.D.
Chair: Cathleen C. Piazza (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
BRIAN D. GREER (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Brian Greer is an Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and a Case Manager in the Severe Behavior Disorders Program at the Munroe-Meyer Institute's Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders (CASD). He received a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Florida in 2008. In 2011, Dr. Greer obtained a Master of Arts in Applied Behavioral Science from the University of Kansas, where he later completed doctoral training in 2013. During his tenure at the University of Kansas, Dr. Greer received the Baer, Wolf, and Risley Outstanding Graduate Student Award for excellence in teaching, research, and service. He later completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute under the direction of Dr. Wayne Fisher. He has served on the Board of Editors for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and as ad-hoc reviewer for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Psychological Record, Behavior Analysis in Practice, Journal of Behavioral Education, International Journal of Developmental Disabilities, Translational Issues in Psychological Science, and the European Journal of Pediatrics. Dr. Greer currently supervises two R01 grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) on stimulus-control refinements of functional communication training and preventing relapse of destructive behavior using behavioral momentum theory.
Abstract:

Functional communication training (FCT) is widely cited as the most common function-based intervention for treating socially reinforced destructive behavior, capable of demonstrating significant reductions in the destructive response while also promoting adaptive communication skills. Recent research has revealed a number of refinements to FCT that can help guide best practice. These empirically supported modifications to FCT include (a) minimizing exposure to the establishing operation(s) that occasion destructive behavior, (b) programming discriminative stimuli to facilitate the rapid thinning of reinforcement schedules and to promote generalization of treatment effects, (c) introducing alternative sources of reinforcement when needed, and (d) utilizing strategies that mitigate the recurrence of destructive behavior (i.e., treatment relapse) when caregivers fail to implement the treatment as designed. This presentation will cover some of the research supporting these modifications to FCT, as well as provide behavior analysts with suggestions for their implementation.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) state at least two general approaches to function-based treatment of problem behavior; (2) identify at least one form of treatment relapse; (3) describe an extinction burst, renewal, and resurgence of problem behavior; and (4) identify at least two specific modifications for improving functional communication training.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #9
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Graphical Practices in Behavior Analysis: Adverse Effects of Nonstandard Line Graphs
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
2:30 PM–3:20 PM
Miramar Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Richard M. Kubina Jr., Ph.D.
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (FirstSteps for Kids)
RICHARD M. KUBINA JR. (Pennsylvania State University)
Richard M. Kubina, Jr., has a bachelor's degree (psychology) from Youngstown State University and a masters and a doctoral degree (special education) from The Ohio State University. Dr. Kubina is a Professor of Special Education at The Pennsylvania State University and teaches courses on methods for teaching reading, informal assessment, behavior analysis, and single case design. Dr. Kubina conducts wide-ranging research in the area of applied behavior analysis and precision teaching. Dr. Kubina is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, Doctoral level (BCBA-D) and serves on a number of editorial boards for behavioral and special education journals. He was the past editor of the Journal of Precision Teaching and Celeration.
Abstract: Few of us would attend a hospital where 85% of the doctors made a judgment error. Yet a recent study revealed an 85% error rate in graph construction for 4,313 graphs across 11 behavior journals. Another study showed that trend analysis in behavioral journals has widespread variability; qualifications of trends such as "rapidly" and "moderately increasing" expose the price of subjectively embraced by behavior analysts. The fundamental data-driven process involving line graphs occur within fieldwork, theses, dissertations, lectures, conference presentations, and journal articles. Therefore, the problems with rampant graph constructor error and subjective determinations of key analytical techniques such as trend analysis require a meaningful solution. The current presentation will share data and discuss how foundational assessment procedures involving line graphs can improve with standard ratio charts.
Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1)) describe the proportional construction rule for constructing a linear graph; (2) compare essential structure and quality features of linear graph construction; (3) define nonstandardization as it applies to linear graphs.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #10
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
San Juan Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Mark O'Reilly, Ph.D.
Chair: Naomi Swiezy (HANDS in Autism, IU School of Medicine)
MARK O'REILLY (The University of Texas at Austin)
Mark O'Reilly, Ph.D., holds the Audrey Rogers Myers Centennial Professorship in Education and is Chair of the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include assessment and treatment of severe challenging behavior in individuals with autism spectrum disorders, design and assessment of assistive technology for individuals with multiple disabilities, and communication/social skills intervention for individuals with autism spectrum disorders.
Abstract: Many individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are candidates for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This presentation will review two current trends in AAC research involving persons with ASD. The first trend is the use of smartphone and tablet devices in AAC interventions. The second trend is the direct comparison of the relative efficacy of differing AAC options (e.g., comparing the use of manual signs versus picture-based communication systems versus speech-generating devices). Studies in the first group suggest that this relatively new technology can be effectively used in AAC intervention. Studies in the second group indicate differences in how quickly some individuals have learned to use different options and difference in preference for the various options. Both research trends suggest possible new directions in AAC intervention such as facilitating choice, enhancing more sophisticated communication repertoires, and promoting greater inclusion in regular life settings.
Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the most frequently used AAC options for persons with ASD and the instructional methods used to teach these individuals to use AAC options.; (2) critically describe the recent comparative research evaluating AAC options with the ASD population.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #11
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Sex Education for Individuals Diagnosed With Autism Spectrum Disorders: What to Do, What to Avoid
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Miramar Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Bobby Newman, Ph.D.
Chair: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
BOBBY NEWMAN (Room to Grow)
Bobby Newman is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, Licensed Behavior Analyst, and Licensed Psychologist. Affectionately known as the Dark Overlord of ABA, Bobby is the first author on 13 books regarding applied behavior analysis, the philosophy of behaviorism, autism spectrum disorders, and utopian literature. He has published over two dozen articles in professional journals, as well as numerous popular magazine articles, and has hosted two series of radio call-in shows. Bobby is the Past-President of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment and the New York State Association for Behavior Analysis. A popular speaker, Bobby also provides direct treatment, staff training, and consultation around the world, and has been honored for this work by several parent and professional groups. He is the director of Room to Grow. Bobby is also a certified personal trainer and marathoner and is an Ambassador for the Great Sportsmanship Programme. In addition to his other clinical work, Bobby teaches non-violent crisis intervention philosophy and techniques for agencies and families and is an instructor for the Our Whole Lives Sex Education curriculum.
Abstract: Individuals diagnosed on the autism spectrum, and with developmental disabilities more generally, are often not provided with even basic sex education. Misconceptions regarding the sexuality of such individuals is often highly misunderstood, leading to further confusion and restrictions. Socially inappropriate behavior, both as a result of this lack of education and as a result of aspects of some disabilities, is unfortunately common and can lead to very serious social and even legal consequences. This presentation discusses these issues, and suggests means for addressing them through a comprehensive applied behavior analytic approach.
Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1)  describe for parents and direct care providers the reasons that sex education is difficult for individuals diagnosed on the autism spectrum; (2) create sex education programs for individuals diagnosed on the autism spectrum, both for skill-teaching and reducing the frequency of behaviors that are interfering with the learning process; (3) teach clients how to discriminate safe and unsafe environments for masturbation; (4) choose appropriate curricula for teaching sexual behavior.
 

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