Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Program by Invited Events: Saturday, May 28, 2022


 

Invited Symposium #16
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Scholarly Contributions to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Paper Competition Winners
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: DEI; Domain: Translational
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Pepperdine University), Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Hughes Fong, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This competition is designed to encourage, promote, and reward behavior analytic scholarship on topics and issues in DEI, both in the field of behavior analysis and more broadly. Students (graduate or undergraduate) and post-graduate professionals who have completed empirical or conceptual papers relevant to DEI that are informed, at least in part, by a behavior-analytic perspective were invited to submit. This symposium includes presentations by the 2021 Student category winner, the 2022 Student category winner, and the 2022 Professional category winner.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the importance of measuring teacher-student interactions in the preschool setting; (2) state at least one reason why considering culture within behavior analysis is important; (3) identify at least one cultural adaptation that has been made within assessment, training, and intervention; (4) reflect on the importance language plays in the context of service delivery; (5) identify challenges in accessing services from the Latinx population and how to create learning opportunities.
 
Diversity submission 

A Behavioral Approach to Analyzing Bias-Based Behaviors in Public Schools

(Theory)
DAPHNE SNYDER (Western Michigan University), Sydney Marie Harmon (Western Michigan University), Nicole Hollins (EdBeeConsultations, LLC)
Abstract:

Students of color are more likely to receive negative teacher-student interactions compared to their peers. Some have attributed the inequalities of teacher-student interactions to implicit bias or bias-based behaviors. Given the impact of bias-based behaviors on student academic and social outcomes, it is critical for school-based practitioners to objectively measure bias-based behaviors to assist in providing culturally relevant and socially significant treatments. The most commonly cited procedure for assessing bias is the Implicit Bias Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). While the IRAP assessment has produced socially significant results, the utility and acceptability of the IRAP in school-based settings may be limited due to several factors. Moreover, there is limited research that extends the assessment of bias-based behaviors to treatment in primary educational settings. Practitioners must have an efficient data collection system to measure interactions and use the data collection system when providing feedback to school personnel. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to discuss considerations to current procedures being used to assess bias-based behaviors and propose the Teacher Student Interaction Tool (T-SIT) for school-based practitioners. The utility and considerations of the T-SIT will be discussed.

Daphne Snyder, MA, BCBA, LBA, is a doctoral student at Western Michigan University under the direction of Dr. Stephanie Peterson. She received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Global Health Studies at Allegheny College. Her main research interests include the assessment and treatment of challenging behavior in the school setting and training teachers to implement effective classroom management strategies. Currently, Daphne is the Project Coordinator for KRESA Classroom Consultations (KCC). KCC provides graduate and undergraduate students with the opportunity to learn about applied behavior analysis and collaborate with multi-disciplinary teams in the school setting.
 
Diversity submission 

Cultural Responsiveness in Assessment, Implementer Training, and Intervention: A Systematic Review

(Theory)
DANIEL KWAK (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

This systematic review consists of 22 peer-reviewed single subject and group design studies that used culturally responsive assessment, implementer training, and intervention to yield positive outcomes for children and adolescents from diverse cultural backgrounds. The studies were published across 15 journals (2010-2021) and included at least 281 implementers and 536 service recipients. The review identified culturally responsive interventions targeting behavioral, social skills, academic, and social-emotional outcomes. Results indicated that most studies considered race, ethnicity, nationality, or language for cultural adaptations in assessment, implementer training, and intervention and addressed the specific culturally sensitive elements suggested by the Ecological Validity Model to some degree. The studies addressed cultural responsiveness in conducting research suggested in the literature, mostly in the area of problem formulation; scant research adequately addressed cultural responsiveness in the area of dissemination. Recommendations, implications, and directions for future research and behavior-analytic practices are discussed.

Daniel Kwak is a Ph.D. candidate in the Applied Behavior Analysis program at University of South Florida under the advisement of Dr. Kwang-Sun Cho Blair. Daniel received his Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with minors in Education and History from University of California, San Diego in 2013. His interest in working with children and students developed when he gained experience in the assessment and treatment of students’ academic, behavioral, and mental health problems in public schools. Daniel received his Master of Arts in Education from University of California, Riverside in 2017. During his time in the program, Daniel found particular interest in behavioral assessment and interventions and began providing behavior-analytic services as direct staff. His passion for behavior analysis led him to receive his Master of Science in Behavioral Psychology from Pepperdine University in 2018. Upon graduating, Daniel was trained and certified as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). To pursue his interest in research and teaching, Daniel enrolled in the Ph.D. program at University of South Florida. In the Ph.D. program, Daniel served as the instructor for several courses including ABA in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, Research Methods and Ethical Issues in Behavior Analysis, Observational Methods and Functional Assessment, and Single Subject Experimental Design in both the undergraduate ABA minor and online master’s degree programs. Additionally, he mentored graduate students in teaching and research by assisting with course development and delivery as well as assisting with conducting literature reviews, developing research questions, running experimental sessions, and writing manuscripts. Daniel’s current research topics include social validity and cultural responsiveness, measurement and analysis, and efficiency and resource allocation. Some specific topics of interest include improving the methods in which social validity of interventions is assessed, determining appropriate ways in which values and cultures of families can be incorporated into service provision, and quantifying effects of interventions to investigate variables that moderate the effects. His dissertation focuses on several of these interests. The purpose of his dissertation is to develop a tool that will be used to culturally adapt behavioral training and interventions, and to evaluate culturally responsive behavioral parent training intervention that is informed by the tool. Through this research, he hopes to provide a tool that behavior analysts can use to take an individualized approach to considering the values and cultures of families. Understanding the lack of consideration of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in behavior analysis has led him to take an active role in starting research projects that address this issue. In the future, he hopes to continue incorporating the topic of DEI within his research, teaching/training, and clinical services as well as advocate for improved graduate training and fieldwork supervision in multiculturalism and diversity.
 
Diversity submission 

Understanding the Role of Cultural Values in Applied Behavior Analysis Service Delivery from Latinx Families

(Theory)
MARIELA CASTRO-HOSTETLER (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

The aim of this study was to identify and learn about the cultural values and beliefs held by Latinx families in Nevada. In addition, we also examined barriers faced by Latinx families when accessing ABA services. In Study 1, we distributed the Participant Demographic and Experience Survey to Latinx families who were currently receiving ABA services or had received services in the past. The survey included questions about the family’s cultural identity, their primary language spoken in the home, and parent educational level. The second part of the questionnaire asked the parents to share their experiences in receiving ABA services and the extent to which those services were received. In Study 2, we conducted structured interviews and focus groups with some of the families who participated in Study 1. From the structured interviews and focus groups, we identified four main themes: (1) family and cultural values; (2) reaction of receiving a diagnosis; (3) impact of ABA services (4) future recommendations for the field of ABA. From these themes, we found what aspects were meaningful in receiving ABA services, as well as barriers that families faced when seeking services.

Mariela Castro-Hostetler is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and Licensed Behavior Analyst in Nevada. She is a Project Coordinator at the Nevada Positive Behavioral Interventions at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and doctoral candidate in the behavior analysis program at UNR. In her role, she provides behavioral support services for families and children with disabilities and dual diagnoses in Nevada. Castro-Hostetler completed her MS in behavior analysis at Southern Illinois University in 2016. Castro-Hostetler’s experience includes more than 8 years working with children and adults across various settings including homes, treatment centers, and schools. Her current research interests include parent and staff training, Acceptance and Commitment Training, and cultural responsiveness for culturally diverse and linguistically diverse individuals.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Empirically Based Analysis of the Traditional Definitions of Conditional Discrimination, Equivalence Classes, and Contextual Control
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Erik Arntzen (Oslo Metropolitan University)
CE Instructor: Paula Debert, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: PAULA DEBERT (University of Sao Paulo)
Abstract: This presentation proposes an empirically based revision of the traditional definitions of conditional discrimination, equivalence classes, and contextual control. Some experiments that employed alternative procedures to matching-to-sample (MTS) will be described and analyzed. Results from these experiments suggested the establishment of behaviors similar to those produced with the MTS procedure. The first experiment to be described indicated that the go/no-go procedure with compound stimuli could generate emergent control by stimulus combinations not presented in training. The second experiment revealed that simple discrimination procedures could generate emergent stimuli substitutability. The final experiment to be described shows that the go/no-go procedure with compound stimuli established what would be called equivalence classes comprising stimuli with multiple class membership without combining them into a single large class. The manner by which stimuli were presented in these experiments does not allow inferring supposed discriminative, conditional, and contextual functions that are specified in the traditional definitions. In order to account for the performances observed in the studies described, it is proposed that the definitions of conditional discrimination, equivalence classes and contextual control specify, respectively, performances that involve stimuli recombination, stimuli substitutability, and stimuli sharing by different equivalence classes without merging them into one. These definitions will allow the use of a wider range of procedures that may be useful in developing new teaching technologies to reach diverse populations and contexts that require procedures alternative to the traditional matching-to-sample.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Basic and applied researchers and practitioners interested in the development of new teaching technology to produce complex behaviors
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe and analyze experiments with alternative procedure to establish emergent behavior; (2) analyze and critic traditional definition of conditional discrimination, equivalence class and contextual control; (3) use new definitions and procedures to establish emergent behaviors.
 
PAULA DEBERT (University of Sao Paulo)
Dr. Paula Debert is a professor of Psychology at Universidade de São Paulo (USP) - Brazil. She is the vice-coordinator of Experimental Psychology Graduate Program in the university and the coordinator of Psychology Undergraduate Program in the Psychology Institute at Universidade de São Paulo. She is a researcher at the Brazilian National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition and Teaching (INCT-ECCE) and a member of the Board of Editors of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Dr. Debert's research focuses on the study of alternative procedures to generate symbolic emergent behaviors.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
When We Speak of Self…
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 154
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Michael D. Hixson (Central Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Timothy D. Hackenberg, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: TIMOTHY D. HACKENBERG (Reed College)
Abstract: The concept of self has a long and complex history in philosophy and psychology, ranging from an inner cause of behavior (e.g., as in psychodynamic theory) to an illusion (e.g., as in some Eastern religious traditions). In this talk, I consider the concept of self through a behavioral lens by identifying some of the conditions surrounding its use. From a behavioral perspective, the concept of self can be viewed as a kind self-discrimination, where some aspect of one’s own body or behavior serves a discriminative function. This encompasses a wide range of discriminative behavior, some shared with other animals, but mostly unique to human social environments in which we are prompted by others to examine our own behavior and the variables of which it is a function. I will discuss this type of self-descriptive behavior, where it comes from, how it relates to self-awareness, the extent to which it is seen in other animals, and relations between aware and unaware repertoires in the same skin. By grounding the concept of self in the particular conditions surrounding its use, my aim is to demystify it, treating it not as a causal entity separate from behavior, but rather, as behavior itself, a class of environment-behavior relations. This provides the basis for a behavioral view with intriguing parallels to other process-oriented and non-dualistic approaches to self, some of which will be considered in the talk.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Behavior analysts with an interest in conceptual issues
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: (1) provide a behavioral definition of self; (2) distinguish aware from unaware behavior; (3) identify commonalities with other non-dualistic approaches to self.
 
TIMOTHY D. HACKENBERG (Reed College)
Tim Hackenberg has had the good fortune to work with and learn from great teachers and students over the years. He received a B.A. degree in Psychology from the University of California, Irvine in 1982 and a doctorate in Psychology from Temple University in 1987, under the supervision of Philip Hineline. Following a two year post-doctoral research position at the University of Minnesota with Travis Thompson from 1988-90, he served on the faculty in the Behavior Analysis program at the University of Florida from 1990-2009. He is currently a Professor of Psychology at Reed College in Portland Oregon. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, as Associate Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, as President of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, as the Experimental Representative to the ABAI Council, and as the first Director of the ABAI Science Board. His major research interests are in the area of behavioral economics and comparative cognition, with a particular emphasis on decision-making, token economies, and social behavior. In work funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, he and his students have developed procedures for cross-species comparisons of complex behavior.
 
 
Invited Panel #48
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Integrating Cultural Responsiveness Into Supervision: Understanding the Context, Meeting the Need, and Suggestions for Practice
Saturday, May 28, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College)
CE Instructor: Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D.
Panelists: KIM EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC), ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ (Rollins), BRIAN CONNERS (Seton Hall University)
Abstract:

In recent years, much more emphasis has been placed on cultural competence, humility, and responsiveness, as they relate to ABA service provision. These concepts have received attention in published literature, in discussions about issues facing the field, and in our new Ethics Code. The field is making progress in defining these skills, and much discussion exists around the teaching and training of this skill set for practitioners. In addition to these needs, there is an obligation to integrate the coverage of these issues into supervision. In this panel discussion, panelists will review the context and need for this expansion of supervision, the development of a tool to assess the extent to which supervision is culturally responsive, the associated issues in practice and mentorship that should be considered in this context, and future directions for mentoring.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) summarize the ways in which cultural responsiveness enhances the quality and effectiveness of supervision, and how it fulfills our ethical obligations to supervise; (2) describe a tool that has been developed to assess the extent to which cultural responsiveness has been integrated into behavior analytic supervision; (3) discuss a variety of strategies that can be used to model cultural responsiveness within supervision.
KIM EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC)
Ms. Kimberly Edwards, M.Ed., is a Program Manager and educator in Washington, DC. Kimberly has worked in the field of education for more than 10 years. She received a Master of Education from the University of Virginia in 2011 and a Graduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis from George Mason University in 2018. Prior to moving to Washington, DC, Ms. Edwards worked in Richmond, VA, in therapeutic day schools and public schools. Her current work aligns with her research interests, centering on coaching staff on culturally responsive and impactful learning pathways; instructing behavior management; focused professional development; strategizing and developing school-wide anti-racism and effective social behavior practices.
ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ (Rollins)
Adriana Rodriguez is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). She earned her master’s degree in Applied Behavior Analysis and Clinical Science from Rollins College. Adriana has experience working with individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Fragile X syndrome, she has worked with a variety of age groups ranging from early intervention to young adults. Ms. Rodriguez’s graduate research focused on the effect of including cultural concerns when providing parent training on behavioral interventions.
BRIAN CONNERS (Seton Hall University)
Brian Conners, Ph.D., BCBA, is a New Jersey Department of Education certified school psychologist and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. He originally developed the graduate program in Applied Behavior Analysis at Seton Hall University, where he currently serves on their faculty and is their Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Education and Human Services. He has worked within various sectors as a behavior analyst and consultant including public and private schools, psychiatric hospitals, and community agencies. He has presented at state and national conferences and has published articles and book chapters in multicultural and diversity issues in behavior analysis, crisis intervention, and restraint and seclusion practices in schools. He was the editor for the first book ever to be published on diversity issues in the field of ABA entitled, Multiculturalism and Diversity in Applied Behavior Analysis: Bridging Theory and Application.
 
 
Invited Panel #72
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Students' Perspective on Diversity and Culturally Responsive Supervisory Practices and Feedback
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Fernande Deguenon (Brooklyn Autism Center)
CE Instructor: Tanya Lopez, M.S.
Panelists: MAJDI BUZOOR (Arab American University-Palestine; Florida Institute Technology), ANNABEL GARZA (The University of Texas at Austin), TANYA LOPEZ (Positive Behavior Supports)
Abstract:

A critical step in the preparation toward certification as a Behavior Analyst is supervision (Turner et al., 2016). The purpose of supervision is to equip applied behavior analysis (ABA) students with behavior analytic, professional, and ethical skills necessary for effective client treatment in practice (BACB, 2021). The rules for supervision are found in the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, also known as “the Code” (Sellers et al., 2016b). A successful supervision experience involves clearly defined expectations at the onset of the relationship (Sellers et al., 2016a), and accurate training and feedback by the supervisor (Sellers et al., 2019). Factors that are considered include the supervisees’ beliefs and values originating from previous supervision experiences (Turner et al., 2016). Supervisees from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds may also require unique interactions with the supervisors while still satisfying the BACB’s objectives. One aspect of supervision that should be discussed and explored further are the modifications made to the supervision experience for supervisees from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These candidates may require unique interactions with supervisors while still satisfying the BACB’s objectives. This panel discussion will explore the importance of cultural diversity and responsiveness in the supervision experience, challenges that may be experienced by relevant supervisees, and suggested solutions to address them. References Behavior Analyst Certification Board (2016). 2022 Eligibility Requirements. https://www.bacb.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/BCBA-2022EligibilityRequirements_210513.pdf Sellers, T. P., Valentino, A. L., & LeBlanc, L. A. (2016a). Recommended practices for individual supervision of aspiring behavior analysts. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 274-286. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0110-7 Sellers, T. P., Alai-Rosales, S., & MacDonald, R. P. F. (2016b). Taking full responsibility: The ethics of supervision in behavior analytic practice. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 299-308. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0144-x Sellers, T. P., Valentino, A. L., Landon, T. J., & Aiello, S. (2019). Board certified behavior analysts’ supervisory practices of trainees: Survey results and recommendations. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 12(3), 536-546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-019-00367-0 Turner, L. B., Fischer, A. J., & Luiselli, J. K. (2016). Towards a competency-based, ethical, and socially valid approach to the supervision of applied behavior analytic trainees. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 287-298. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0121-4

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe current and future states of BCBAs’ perceptions of supervisory practices; (2) identify at least three challenges and three practical solutions to supervisory practices; (3) describe components of supervisory practices that support cultural diversity and responsiveness.
MAJDI BUZOOR (Arab American University-Palestine; Florida Institute Technology)
Majdi Buzoor graduated in 2006 as an Occupational Therapist from Arab American University-Palestine. He is a certified Sensory Integration Specialist from USC 2012 and started his BCaBA course program at FIT last May and his fieldwork supervised experience with three “amazing” supervisors. Majdi loves his job as an OT, however, the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) has significantly augmented his professional practice, enriched, and improved the quality of his service delivery, which in turn has supported his passion to help many more children who need specialized, individualized effective interventions based on the science of ABA.
ANNABEL GARZA (The University of Texas at Austin)
Annabel Garza graduated from The University of Texas at Austin with a master’s degree in special education with a concentration in autism and developmental disabilities. She is currently working on finishing up her fieldwork experience hours at an early intervention center for children with autism in Austin, Texas. She is planning on sitting for the BCBA exam in the fall of 2022. Annabel enjoys working closely with families and coaching parents/caregivers during direct therapy sessions.
TANYA LOPEZ (Positive Behavior Supports)
Tanya Lopez graduated from Bay Path University with a master’s degree in applied behavior analysis (ABA). She is currently working as a board-certified behavior analyst (BCBA) for Positive Behavior Supports (PBS), providing in-home services for children diagnosed with autism in the state of Massachusetts. In her free time, Tanya enjoys spending time with her husband and son, shopping at Target and ordering Starbucks.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessment of Cannabis’ Relative Value: Laboratory Evaluation of Reward Processing Among Those Who Use Cannabis
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Aston, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ELIZABETH ASTON (Brown University)
Abstract: Behavioral economics, an interdisciplinary field that prioritizes the assessment of reinforcer valuation, provides a powerful approach to examine the relative value of cannabis. Demand, an integral component of a behavioral economic approach to studying cannabis use, characterizes the value of a given reinforcer and facilitates identification of excessive substance valuation. Demand may be obtained via systematic assessment of hypothetical consumption across escalating price on the Marijuana Purchase Task. This talk will present the utility of demand as a potential marker of cannabis risk severity, including use frequency, use of high-potency cannabis formulations, and engagement in hazardous behaviors such as driving following use. This presentation will focus on demand assessment paired with ad libitum cannabis administration in the laboratory, including simulated purchasing behavior, subjective intoxication, and smoking topography (i.e., the way in which one smokes). The talk will conclude with discussion of clinical applications for demand assessment, how behavioral economic approaches can inform policy surrounding cannabis, and how we can tailor demand assessment in the wake of ever-evolving cannabis formulations, modes of administration, and legislation.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Attendees at the MA or Ph.D. level with interest in behavioral economics of substance use

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain behavioral economic theory and its applications as a marker of cannabis use severity; (2) justify how substance demand, or perceived reward value, is a critical individual difference variable with respect to cannabis use; (3) describe how behavioral economic demand indices can be used to assess the influence of cannabis value in the laboratory and in daily life, as well as related clinical and policy implications.
 
ELIZABETH ASTON (Brown University)
Dr. Elizabeth Aston completed her Ph.D. in Neuroscience at Wake Forest School of Medicine. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at the Brown University School of Public Health. She studies the behavioral economics of cannabis use, as well as predictors of cannabis-related outcomes (e.g., frequency, cannabis use disorder, problems) among individuals who use cannabis. She recently completed a K01 career development award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse using qualitative and quantitative methods to modify and validate a behavioral economic measure of demand for cannabis. She is also interested in cannabis’ medical applications, and is currently using qualitative and quantitative methods to study potential medical benefits of cannabis in the treatment of pain and inflammation for individuals with rheumatic diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis).
 
 
Invited Paper Session #77
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Diversity submission Defining, Measuring, and Ensuring the Social Validity of Skills in Interprofessional Collaboration, Compassionate Care, and Cultural Humility in Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 204A/B
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Peter F. Gerhardt (The EPIC School)
CE Instructor: Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
Abstract: In recent years, there has been some discussion of the need to increase the training of behavior analysts in soft skills. Examples of soft skills that have been discussed include active listening, engagement, empathetic statements, and the provision of support. Specifically, some sources of data indicate that behavior analysts may be less skilled in these areas than is ideal (e.g., Taylor et al., 2018; LeBlanc et al., 2019). Given the humanitarian foundations of the field, the focus on the improvement of the human condition, and the associations between consumer satisfaction and outcomes, it is important to maximize the extent to which behavior analysts master and demonstrate these skills. Challenges include operationally defining terms that may be mentalistic in nature, and measuring behaviors that are inherently somewhat subjective. Additional challenges include ensuring that there is a genuineness and authenticity to the demonstration of the skills, and that social validity measures support that they are received well by clients. In recent years, progress has been made in issuing calls to action in the realms of interprofessional collaboration (e.g., Brodhead, 2015), compassionate care (e.g., Taylor et al, 2018; LeBlanc et al, 2019) and cultural humility (e.g., Fong et al, 2016; Miller et al, 2019; Wright, 2019). Models from other fields have been reviewed, adaptations of existing tools and models have been suggested, and the BACB Code of Ethics has been expanded to include these obligations (BACB, 2020). Several recent empirical explorations of work in these areas will be shared, and directions for future research and training will be suggested. Reasons for enthusiasm and hope will be reviewed, as the field both returns to its roots and meets the challenges of the future in this endeavor to expand the skill sets of practicing behavior analysts.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate student.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list several component skills that have been suggested as lacking in the professional repertoires of behavior analysts; (2) describe how soft skill components might enhance outcomes of behavior analytic intervention and of collaboration with other professionals; (3) provide examples of how the component skills of compassionate care, interprofessional collaboration, and cultural humility might be defined for the contexts of collaboration and service provision; (4) review challenges in evaluating the mastery of these skills, including generalization to natural contexts, passing tests of authenticity, ensuing culturally responsive skill development, and obtaining social validity ratings from multiple stakeholders and experts; (5) identify future research questions and current strategies for student/staff training in these areas.
 
MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA, is a Professor at Endicott College, where she has been for 10 years, and where she serves as the Executive Director of ABA and Autism Programs, including overseeing the master’s programs in ABA and directing the Ph.D. Program in ABA. She also does research with the team at Melmark. She has worked in the field of ABA and Autism for over 35 years. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1990 and she became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst in 2000. She previously worked for 16 years at the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center at Rutgers University. Her clinical and research interests center on defining best practice ABA techniques, exploring ways to enhance the ethical conduct of practitioners, teaching social skills to learners with autism, training staff to be optimally effective at instruction and at collaboration, and maximizing family members’ expertise and adaptation. She serves on the Scientific Council of the Organization for Autism Research, is on the board of Association for Science in Autism Treatment, is a regular contributor to the ABA Ethics Hotline, and is an advisor to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. She is a regular reviewer for several professional journals, and is a frequent member of service committees for a variety of organizations.
 
 
Invited Panel #105
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Reflections on Our Journey Into DEI: A Conversation With the ABAI DEI Board
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: DEI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Pepperdine University), Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Hughes Fong, Ph.D.
Panelists: R. WAYNE WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), JOVONNIE L. ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno), JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

This panel represents the third annual DEI Board discussion in a series designed to provide the ABAI membership with: 1) updates on Board activities, 2) opportunities for considering specific topics of relevance to advancing DEI efforts within ABAI and more broadly, and 3) a mechanism for input and ideas from the audience. This year’s panel will focus on the potential contributions of behavior analysis theory and scientific research to improving diversity, equity, and inclusion in ABAI and, more generally, in society. A brief review of the Board’s actions over the past year will be provided by the Co-Coordinators of the ABAI DEI Board, Elizabeth Fong, and Ramona Houmanfar. In addition, ABAI DEI Board members will share perspectives on how DEI issues have impacted our ABA community. Time for questions and comments from the audience will be included to allow for sharing relevant experiences and lessons learned.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

intermediate - good grasp of ABA, some experience or interest in working on DEI issues, some experience or interest in working with diverse populations

Learning Objectives: 1. Name at least one step that behavior analysts are taking to address DEI in the field 2. Identify ways that they can engage in DEI practice 3. Identify ways that DEI issues have impacted our ABA community
R. WAYNE WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
JOVONNIE L. ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno)
JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
 
 
Invited Paper Session #106
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Technology to Extend the Collection and Use of Behavioral Data in Applied Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 154
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Erica N. Feuerbacher (Virginia Tech)
CE Instructor: Kathryn L. Kalafut, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: KATHRYN L. KALAFUT (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Behavioral data is necessary in order to make informed decisions about the welfare of humans and animals, but its collection can be challenging--particularly so in animal care facilities. Traditional methods of collecting insightful behavioral data require time, resources, and experts who understand data analysis and visualization. Furthermore, in order for data to be used in-the-moment to make decisions about an animal’s care, it needs to be collected, analyzed, and visualized on a continuous basis. While this is nearly impossible to achieve with the methods frequently used in applied settings, it is not for those used in a basic laboratory. By finding inspiration from the standard operant chamber, and taking advantage of the availability of microcontrollers and sensors, automating data collection in applied settings is more feasible than ever. This presentation will discuss what it takes to provide continuous welfare for animals living under human care, and how we can achieve this with the use of current technologies. Projects involving domestic cats, Asian elephants, and penguins will be used to highlight the current usage as well as future applications.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Anyone interested in 1) how technology can be used to enhance data collection and use; 2) those interested in animal work; 3) those interested in animal welfare.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the importance and value of using technology in ABA; (2) cite specific examples of how technology has enhanced the knowledge of animal behavior and captive animal environments; (3) find resources to develop and use technology in their own practice; (4) discuss the value and importance of cross-disciplinary collaboration in our field; (5) identify raspberry pi(e) as more than just a delicious dessert.
 
KATHRYN L. KALAFUT (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Katie has published animal research in both applied and basic settings. Her background of basic and applied work carries equal weight in the research she conducts today. Her passion lies in building captive animal environments that enhance animal welfare, from building devices that continuously collect data to developing platforms that facilitate up-to-the-minute, data-based decisions regarding an animal's care. She does this work both as an Associate Professor at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology in Applied Behavior Analysis, as well as CEO of Tracks Technology, a consulting company working with animal facilities to collect, analyze, and interpret behavioral data to ensure the highest welfare for their animals.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #107
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Verbal Behavior and the Emergence of Novel Responses in Children With Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Yanerys Leon (University of Miami)
CE Instructor: Andresa De Souza, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANDRESA DE SOUZA (University of Missouri St. Louis)
Abstract: Skinner (1957) developed a taxonomy of verbal behavior and referred to the different functional responses as verbal operants. Focused behavior interventions for children with autism and other developmental disabilities typically target each verbal operant individually and increase complexity as children expand their verbal repertoire (Sundberg & Partington, 1999). Considering the extent of a person’s verbal repertoire, it is unrealistic to believe that one can directly teach a child with communication and language delays all topographies of verbal behavior. Therefore, it is important not only to evaluate the effectiveness of verbal behavior interventions but also to identify strategies that can efficiently promote the acquisition of new responses. Research has shown that instructional conditions can be arranged to facilitate the emergence of novel, untrained verbal responses. This presentation will share some of the research about this topic and present strategies to promote the emergence of novel responses when programming verbal behavior instructions for children with autism.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Behavior analysts, speech and language pathologists, psychologists, graduate students, autism service providers
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain the importance of programming for the emergence of verbal responses; (2) distinguish between directly taught and emergent responses; (3) describe at least one procedure to facilitate the emergence of verbal operants.
 
ANDRESA DE SOUZA (University of Missouri St. Louis)
Dr. Andresa De Souza is an Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri – St. Louis and currently serves as the Dissemination Coordinator for the Verbal Behavior – Special Interest Group (VB-SIG). She received a Master’s in Behavior Analysis and Therapy from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale under the supervision of Dr. Ruth Anne Rehfeldt and a Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis from the University of Nebraska Medical Center under the supervision of Dr. Wayne Fisher. She completed her Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Marcus Autism Center and Emory University in Atlanta, GA. During her studies, Dr. De Souza gained valuable experience in early-intervention applications for children with autism, the assessment and treatment of severe problem behavior, and the autism diagnostic criteria. She has provided supervision for behavior analysts and worked as a consultant for international sites. Dr. De Souza published several peer-reviewed articles on applications of Skinner’s verbal behavior within the framework of an autism diagnosis, and currently serves on the editorial board of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior. Her research focuses on strategies for teaching verbal behavior, the arrangement of conditions that can facilitate the emergence of novel language and decrease restricted stimulus control, and caregiver training.
 
 
Invited Symposium #126
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Organizational Behavior Management, and Leadership: A Discussion of Definitions and Best Practice Among Three Vital Areas of Professional Emphasis in Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jacob A Sadavoy (Committed Behavior)
Discussant: Lina M. Slim (ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC; Endicott College; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
CE Instructor: Jacob A Sadavoy, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium brings together several important and interrelated topics in the field of behavior analysis. The first talk will discuss how supervision and organizational behavior management (OBM) overlap and address some common misunderstandings in the field. The next presentations will discuss best practice in both leadership behavior and applying supervision principles to the development of behavior analysts. The final presentation will discuss in detail how the principles of supervision, leadership, and OBM generalize outside of clinical training.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain how they can work smarter, not harder, as supervisors; (2) state at least three skills an effective leader must gain; (3) state exactly the steps they need to take to improve at least three skills.

Learning Objectives: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
 

Individualized Supervision of Students and New Behavior Analysts in Human Services

BYRON J. WINE (The Faison Center; University of Virginia)
Abstract:

This presentation will discuss best practices for training behavior analysts. Specifically, we will examine a mentorship model, where aspiring behavior analysts are trained as junior colleagues. During the formal accumulation of hours, we will discuss how to gain both the skills necessary to practice as a behavior analyst in general, but also to function in the specific role for an organization. Then, after certification we will discuss how behavior analysts can continue with the mentorship model and grow based upon their individualized goals.

Dr. Byron Wine is the vice president of operations at the Faison Center, as well as an assistant professor at the Florida Institute of Technology and visiting assistant professor at the University of Virginia. He completed his doctoral degree from Temple University under the guidance of Drs. Saul Axelrod and Donald Hantula. Dr. Wine has published over 20 peer-reviewed publications primarily in the area of organizational behavior management. Currently, he serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management and Behavior Analysis in Practice.
 

The Application of Supervision Competencies in Sports, Health and Fitness

LAURIE BONAVITA (Positive Behavior Supports Corporation; Bay Path University)
Abstract:

This presentation and discussion will examine all information presented and relate information to health, fitness, and sports performance. We will examine how supervision competencies can be trained and generalized to applications that may be considered atypical to our science. Consideration will be given to our ethical obligations in this type of supervision, and how our trainees and our science may benefit if we embrace these competencies and opportunities.

Dr. Bonavita has worked in the field of applied behavior analysis for over 20 years. Her experience includes working in home, school, and residential settings and she has served as an expert witness on autism spectrum disorders for the Massachusetts department of children and families. Dr. Bonavita is an avid sports fan, and her love of sports has guided several research projects surrounding increasing sports performance in athletes of all ages and abilities as well as the area of health and fitness. She is currently working with her students on research projects on the topic of building culturally sensitive behavior analysts. Dr. Bonavita is the Regional Clinical Training Coordinator for Positive Behavior Supports Corporation, Massachusetts where she oversees the Student Mentor program working with staff BCBA’s to provide quality supervision for those team members enrolled in an ABA graduate programs. Dr. Bonavita also serves as an adjunct faculty member at Bay Path University.
 

Supervision and Organizational Behavior Management: How They Interrelate and Why Distinguishing Between the Two is Important

SHARLET RAFACZ (California State University, Fresno)
Abstract:

Supervision in applied behavior analysis (ABA) has become more and more important to the field. This is reflected in several ways, including an increasing number of published articles on Supervision and changes to the coursework, training, and continuing education requirements for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA). However, there may be some issues with respect to conflating Supervision with Organizational Behavior Management (OBM), a commonly recognized subfield of ABA. The primary objective of this talk will be to help clarify where the two areas overlap and where they are distinct. We will begin by defining both OBM and Supervision. We will then discuss how specific elements of OBM are present in Supervision, but also how Supervision when utilized in ABA encompasses several additional components. Several examples of how this looks across different supervision roles will be presented. Why this distinction is important and how it informs course curriculum, training, and continuing education in both Supervision and OBM will then be discussed.

Dr. Sharlet Rafacz received her Ph.D. in Psychology with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis and Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) from the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Rafacz was an Assistant Professor at Savannah State University and is currently an Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at California State University, Fresno. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in learning, applied behavior analysis, research methods, ethics, health behavior, and OBM. Her research in OBM focuses on utilizing motivating operations to alter employee behavior, component analyses of performance scorecards, and on cooperation and countercontrol in organizational settings. She also conducts research on increasing healthy eating behavior by children, college students, and consumers in a variety of settings. Dr. Rafacz has published her research in several behavioral journals, including Perspectives on Behavior Science and the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. She also serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. She is the Past-President for the Organizational Behavior Management Network and has served on the California Association for Behavior Analysis Board as the Northern California Academic Liaison.
 
Common Skills of Effective Supervisors and Great Leaders
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

Supervisors, as individuals in positions of leadership, need to be decisive, productive, dependable, and efficient at the same time of being caring and understanding. Great leaders are not born with such skills, but they do have common characteristics that are a set of skills they have gained in their lifetime. In this talk, I will discuss the core skills every great leader possesses and offer practical tips for supervisors looking to become strong leaders.

Dr. Kazemi is the Chief Science Officer at Behavioral Health Center of Excellence (BHCOE), where she oversees standard development, evaluation methodology, and measurement science. She is also a professor at CSUN, where she has developed and teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in behavior analysis. She founded the M.S. in Applied Behavior Analysis program in 2010 and has collaborated with the CSUN community to provide graduate students high quality supervision experiences. Her research interests involve identification of efficient, effective strategies for practical training, supervision, and leadership. She is also invested in leveraging technology (e.g., A.I., robotics, V.R) for efficient training and feedback using simulations. She has worked on several nationwide large projects (e.g., with FEMA and NASA) with a focus on effective training and behavioral outcomes. She has received several mentorship awards including the ABAI Best Mentor Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award, the Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Service Award. She has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, staff turnover, and the use of technology in behavior analysis. She is the leading author of a handbook written for both supervisors and supervisees that is titled, Supervision and Practicum in Behavior Analysis: A Handbook for Supervisees.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #131
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Getting Unstuck: How Behavior Analysts Can Talk to Marginalized Communities, Behave Flexibly, and Change the World
Saturday, May 28, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jeanne M. Donaldson (Louisiana State University)
CE Instructor: Matthew Capriotti, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
Abstract: As behavior analysts, we know the potential of our science to change the world. Behavior analysis points to powerful interventions for a range of individuals’ challenges and societies’ ills, without assigning stigmatizing diagnoses of personal or cultural deficits, such as character problems and broken brains. Our beloved science has made enormous impacts in a few areas. And yet, behavior analysis’ reach is far from what Skinner imagined possible. At the same time, we behavior analysts often bemoan feeling misunderstood by colleagues and by society. Our science, and our reputations, tend to get stuck within our research and practice communities, and within tried-and-true applications. I propose that we can get our science “unstuck” through thoughtful collaboration with underserved and oppressed communities, and with the professionals who have long served them. As an exemplar of a recent (and ongoing) success story that has leveraged these principles, I will discuss how behavior analysts have changed the landscape of treatment for people with tic disorders across the world. To exemplify an unfulfilled opportunity for such progress, I will discuss potential applications of behavior analysis into LGBTQ+ health and wellness. I will present my own work in these two areas, with particular attention to intentional professional actions outside the traditional bounds of behavior analysis. This will include honest discussion of both “wins” (wherein such work has led to increased impact) and “misses” (wherein such projects have led down the rabbit holes of mentalism). I will conclude with practical suggestions for behavior analysts looking to expand the scope of their work into new areas.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: faculty researchers, university educators, applied practitioners, graduate students
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss research strategies and tactics that enable pragmatic scaling of behavior analysis; (2) describe how non-behavior-analytic research approaches contributed to the successful dissemination of behavior-analytic treatments for tic disorders; (3) identify steps that may aid early career researchers in conducting community-partnered research in new areas.
 
MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
Dr. Matthew Capriotti is an Associate Professor of Psychology at San Jose State University. He completed his BS in Psychology at the University of Florida in 2010, and he then earned his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2015. Prior to joining the faculty at San Jose State University, Dr. Capriotti completed predoctoral and postdoctoral fellowships in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Francisco. His research interests lie in the behavioral treatment of Tourette Syndrome and in the study of processes that drive health and wellness among LGBTQ+ people. Dr. Capriotti has employed varied methodological approaches to conduct research across the basic-to-applied continuum. His earliest work investigated rats’ responding on multiple schedules. His subsequent programs of research on tic disorders and LGBTQ+ health have employed a range of methodological approaches and content foci, including within-case laboratory studies on behavioral processes in clinical populations, clinical trials, dissemination and implementation projects, phenomenological and epidemiological investigations of neurobehavioral and psychiatric conditions, experiments evaluating environmental determinants of stigma, survey- and interview-based qualitative research on facilitators and barriers of psychosocial treatment, and community-based participatory research. Dr. Capriotti is the author of 46 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference presentations.
 
 
Invited Panel #132
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Mathematical Principles of Reinforcement: A Panel with Discussion
Saturday, May 28, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: M. Christopher Newland (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: M. Christopher Newland, Ph.D.
Panelists: M. CHRISTOPHER NEWLAND (Auburn University), JOHN FALLIGANT (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), BRENT KAPLAN (University of Kentucky)
Abstract:

This session, a follow-up to Peter Killeen’s tutorial on Mathematical Principles of Reinforcement, will offer examples of MPR’s application and thoughts about potential uses. Why consider applying MPR? It is a comprehensive theory of behavior that is derived from three elementary, common-sensical principles. The data required for model fitting, which come from a series of fixed-ratios or a progressive ratio schedule, are acquired quickly. The ability of its parameters to distinguish reinforcer efficacy, how reinforcers select recent behavior, and motor characteristics of behavior can yield insight into behavioral determinants. Chris Newland will describe its application in characterizing the actions of drugs and contaminants that act on the nervous system, John Michael Falligant will explore its potential applications to applied behavior analysis, and Brent Kaplan will describe how it might address issues in substance abuse.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Basic and translational investigators interested in applying MPR, board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe what the parameters of the MPR model say about behavior; (2) describe how it has been applied in several arenas; (3) describe potential areas where MPR might be applied.
M. CHRISTOPHER NEWLAND (Auburn University)
Chris Newland directs a laboratory to investigate drugs and contaminants that affect behavioral and brain development using experimental models. With his students, he has reported troubling impairments in behavioral plasticity, choice, and learning that can be traced to low-level methylmercury exposure during the prenatal and adolescent periods or drug exposure during adolescence. For example, he reported that methylmercury during gestion accelerates aging long after exposure ends. He is also involved in a project to reduce the use of psychotropic medicine among children in foster care. Dr. Newland has served on numerous panels guiding federal environmental policy as well as grant review panels for the NIH and the EPA. He has played leadership roles in the Society of Toxicology and the Association for Behavior Analysis International. He teaches courses at all levels in behavioral neuroscience, psychopharmacology, conditioning and learning, and clinical psychopharmacology in developmental disabilities.
JOHN FALLIGANT (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
Dr. Falligant is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Senior Behavior Analyst in the inpatient Neurobehavioral Unit at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. The Neurobehavioral Programs at the Kennedy Krieger Institute serve individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who suffer from severe behavioral dysfunction, including self-injury. Dr. Falligant’s clinical work and research is focused on the assessment and treatment of behavioral dysfunction in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. He is also interested in translational behavioral research involving models of choice behavior and impulsivity, reward sensitivity, behavioral persistence, and the identification and quantification of predictive behavioral markers. Dr. Falligant is a clinical psychologist and Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D). He received his Ph.D. from Auburn University. He completed his Doctoral Internship and a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
BRENT KAPLAN (University of Kentucky)

Brent Kaplan received his Ph.D. in behavioral psychology at the University of Kansas and subsequently completed his postdoctoral training at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at Virginia Tech. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and a member of the Healthier Futures Laboratory. Brent’s research focuses on applying behavioral economic concepts and methodology to better understand alcohol and cigarette substance use and treatments. His interests also include developing and disseminating tools for analyzing and interpreting behavioral economic data. He has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and Perspectives on Behavior Science and currently serves on the executive committee for Division 28 Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse of the American Psychological Association.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #147
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Disordered Behavioral Processes and Diet-Induced Obesity
Saturday, May 28, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 154
Area: EAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Karen M. Lionello-DeNolf (Assumption University)
CE Instructor: Kimberly Kirkpatrick, Ph.D.
KIMBERLY KIRKPATRICK (Kansas State University), Travis Ray Smith (Kansas State University)
Abstract: No one chooses to become obese, yet obesity rates have risen steadily over the past 40 years and obesity is now one of the most widespread behavioral diseases. Obesity does not emerge from any one choice, but from the accumulation of many poor dietary and lifestyle choices. Many everyday choices can be impulsive choices, such as choosing to eat convenient fast-food items instead of taking the time to prepare a healthy meal. Research with rodent pre-clinical models has found that a diet high in processed saturated fat and/or sugar increased impulsive choices, impaired temporal discrimination, altered food reward value, and modified food choice and consumption behaviors. Dietary schedules that may simulate food insecurity, such as intermittent access to fat and sugar, also increased impulsive choices and altered food reward value. This suggests that an HF diet can impair self-control and related behavioral processes that are needed to avoid future intake of unhealthful foods, thus leading to a vicious cycle that may promote diet-induced obesity. The rodent model controls for dietary history so that specific causal mechanisms can be identified. Research pinpointing core behavioral mechanisms of diet-induced obesity can supply important insights for guiding the development of future obesity treatments.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students
Learning Objectives: PENDING
 
KIMBERLY KIRKPATRICK (Kansas State University)
Dr. Kimberly Kirkpatrick is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychological Sciences at Kansas State University. She directs the Reward, Timing, and Decision laboratory which is funded by a $1.9M grant from the National Institutes of Mental Health. She also directs the Cognitive and Neurobiological Approaches to Plasticity (CNAP) Center of Biomedical Research Excellence which was founded in 2017 through a $10.6M grant from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences. Kirkpatrick received the Kansas State Distinguished Graduate Faculty Award in 2018 and became a University Distinguished Professor in 2019. She currently serves on the ABAI Science Board. Dr. Kirkpatrick studies everyday choices which can lead to long-term health problems such as obesity, substance abuse, and other impulse control disorders. She has found that diets high in processed sugar and saturated fats can undermine self-control and lead individuals to develop a pattern of problematic daily choices, known as impulsive choices. She has also developed interventions to promote self-control as a treatment for impulsive choices, which is the topic of her current R01 grant. Kirkpatrick graduated with a bachelor’s in Psychology from Iowa State University. She completed her PhD at the University of Iowa in Psychology with a focus on Behavioral Neuroscience and then subsequently completed her post-doctoral training at Brown University. She started her career as a faculty member at the University of York (UK) before joining the faculty at Kansas State in 2008.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #150
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Current Landscape of the Global Dissemination of Applied Behavior Analysis: Perspectives on Supervision and Beyond
Saturday, May 28, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Lina M. Slim (ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC; Endicott College; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
CE Instructor: Jacob A Sadavoy, M.S.
Presenting Author: JACOB A SADAVOY (Committed Behavior)
Abstract:

The field of behaviour analysis is growing exponentially in North America (Carr & Nosik, 2017; Deochand & Fuqua, 2016) however, there exists many barriers that impede similar expansion of the field internationally. This presentation will share survey results related to those barriers from six regions: Africa, Asia, Australia/New Zealand, Europe, the Middle East, and South America. We will compare and contrast the behaviour analytic landscape in these regions with a focus on challenges related to supervision (e.g., access, financial constraints, infrastructure, etc.). We will examine the respondents' answers to gain greater insights into these barriers and discuss national initiatives and action steps to respond to this crisis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify five barriers that impede effective, sustainable international dissemination; (2) identify areas of need per region and develop individualized recommendations informed by respondent data; (3) describe the three ways in which the international behaviour analytic community can be supported domestically, in North America.
 
JACOB A SADAVOY (Committed Behavior)
Jacob A. Sadavoy is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst with over 20 years of experience applying the principles of applied behaviour analysis in home programs, clinical center-based programs, school environments as a teacher and educational consultant, businesses, and hospitals throughout North America. To date, Jacob has travelled to fifteen different countries to collaborate with local practitioners to develop culturally-informed, socially significant, behaviour analytic strategies dynamic to the local environment and culture. The ethical challenges and barriers of disseminating ABA effectively throughout the world culminated in Understanding Ethics in Applied Behavior Analysis: Practical Applications. Jacob also sat as the 2019 Vice President of the Ethics and Behavior Analysis Special Interest Group, Teamwork Healthcare's Clinical Board, and a member of the Behaviour Analysis Supervision Special Interest Group addressing international supervision. Jacob’s key areas of interest are ethics, supervision, sustainable dissemination, social justice, and services across the lifespan. Jacob's interest in social justice and compassionate care has culminated in a 2021 tome, A Scientific Framework for Compassion and Social Justice: Lessons in Applied Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #151
CE Offered: BACB
From Standardized Measurements to Biomarkers: The Emerging Science of Treatment Outcomes in Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism Research
Saturday, May 28, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
CE Instructor: Javier Virues Ortega, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JAVIER VIRUES ORTEGA (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Abstract:

Applied behavior-analytic (ABA) interventions have traditionally relied on frequent samples of operationally-defined performances compounded with unstandardized social validity measures as the sole basis of treatment evaluation. While this approach has served the field well for decades, it has faced fierce opposition from non-behavioral scientists who often rely on group-based studies and standardized outcomes as their lingua franca. This protracted conflict questions the very nature of scientific evidence and alienates behavior analysis from mainstream autism science. The conflict has an impact on how behavior analysis is viewed and portrayed, and has far reaching consequences on research funding, health and education policies, and, ultimately, availability of services. Yet, behavior analysts have failed to take up this generational challenge. With examples from his own work, the presenter will look at ABA research through the lens of an array of established and emerging clinical research outcomes including behavioral markers, standardized assessment coresets, biomarkers, and selected medical metrics. We will also discuss the contexts under which these various outcomes could be complementary to the behavioral dimension of ABA. Finally, we will lay a plausible roadmap of strategic research that could help to establish ABA intervention as a widely accepted evidence-based service for autism.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Autism professionals, certified behavior analysts, students of all levels, active ABA researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the key differences in outcome research traditions in ABA and mainstream autism science; (2) discuss in the context of an ABA study the notion of treatment behavioral marker; (3) discuss in the context of an ABA study the notion of standardized outcomes coreset; (4) discuss in the context of an ABA study the notion of treatment biomarker.
 
JAVIER VIRUES ORTEGA (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Javier Virues-Ortega is a Ramón y Cajal senior research fellow at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain) and honorary associate professor at The University of Auckland. Previously, he has been assistant professor of psychology at the University of Manitoba (Canada) and postdoctoral researcher at the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain). His research focuses on the evaluation of interventions based on applied behavior analysis (ABA) for people with and without disabilities. He has an interest in transferring mainstream outcome research methods into ABA. He is author of over one hundred specialized publications. His work has been cited thousands of times and has been featured in the health coverage policies and authoritative advice of international organizations including UnitedHealthcare, Blue Cross Blue Shield, ICHOM, and others. Virues-Ortega has served as associate editor or member of the editorial board for eight leading behavioral journals and has serve as member of the board of directors and executive committees of leading professional organizations including the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and the European Association for Behavior Analysis.
 

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