Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Program by Invited Events: Sunday, May 29, 2022


 

Invited Paper Session #183
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Variables and Measurements That are Important to Take into Consideration in Stimulus Equivalence Research
Sunday, May 29, 2022
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Caio F. Miguel (California State University, Sacramento)
CE Instructor: Erik Arntzen, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ERIK ARNTZEN (Oslo Metropolitan University)
Abstract:

Stimulus equivalence has been a lively research area for more than 50 years starting with the Sidman (1971) study. Since then, a huge number of experiments with variety of procedural variants have been published. The presentation will discuss some of the variables influencing the establishment of baseline conditional discriminations and the emergence of untrained relations during testing. Overall variables such as training structures, training and test protocols, and simultaneous vs. delay matching-to-sample, and details like concurrent vs serialized or sequential presentation of baseline trials and number of training trials will be discussed. Also, additional measurements in stimulus equivalence research as reaction time and sorting will be examined.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe different variables that could influence the outcome on tests for emergent relations; (2) analyze important differences among training structures; (3) how sorting tests could be used to track stimulus class formation.
 
ERIK ARNTZEN (Oslo Metropolitan University)
Dr. Erik Arntzen received his Ph.D. from University of Oslo, Norway, in February 2000. Arntzen’s dissertation focused on variables that influenced responding in accordance with stimulus equivalence. He also holds a degree as a specialist in clinical psychology. He is currently a full-time Professor in Behavior Analysis at Oslo Metropolitan University. His research contributions include both basic and applied behavior analysis, with an emphasis on research in relational stimulus control and verbal behavior. He has also been interested in ethical considerations and core values in the field of behavior analysis. Furthermore, he has ongoing research projects within the areas of gambling behavior and consumer behavior. He also runs a research group, Experimental Studies of Complex Human Behavior, at Oslo Metropolitan University. Dr. Arntzen has published papers 190 articles in international and national peer-reviewed journals including Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB), Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), Perspectives on Behavior Science, The Psychological Record (TPR), Behavioral Interventions, European Journal of Behavior Analysis (EJOBA), Analysis of Gambling Behavior, the Analysis of Verbal Behavior, American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & other Dementias, and Psychopharmacology. Dr. Arntzen has served as the president and past-president of the European ABA (2008–2014) and serve as the president from 2017–2020. Dr. Arntzen has been a member of the board of the Norwegian Association for Behavior Analysis from 1987–1993 and from 2006 to present, holds the position as the secretary of international affairs. Dr. Arntzen is a trustee of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He has presented papers at conferences worldwide. Dr. Arntzen has been recognized with awards, including the SABA award for the dissemination of behavior analysis, ABAI award for outstanding mentoring, the research award at Akershus University College, and publication award at Oslo Metropolitan University. Dr. Arntzen is one of the founders and the editor of EJOBA since 2000. He has also served as the editor of Behavior & Philosophy. He has served on the editorials board of several journals, including JEAB, JABA, TPR, International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the Behavior Analyst, and The Behavior Analyst Today.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #199
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Impact on Maternal and Infant Outcomes by Intervening With Maternal Health Behavior
Sunday, May 29, 2022
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
CE Instructor: Yukiko Washio, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: YUKIKO WASHIO (RTI International)
Abstract: Women are often motivated to stay healthy for the well-being of their child during pregnancy and lactation. Generally speaking, women who are pregnant are recommended to eat healthy, exercise properly, and stay away from substance use, including illicit and prescription drugs, alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco, which are potentially harmful to their child. Additionally, breastfeeding is increasingly encouraged as the most recommended feeding practice for at least 6 months, if not longer, to maintain the health of women and their infants. While most women are able to practice a healthy lifestyle during pregnancy and lactation, women with certain social determinants (such as socioeconomic disadvantage, younger age, race/ethnic status, mental health issues, violence exposure, and reproductive and sexual health issues) have difficulties maintaining healthy lifestyles during these critical periods. Various treatment options including behavioral and pharmacological interventions have been developed using computer-based and telecommunication technology to address substance, alcohol, and tobacco use, breastfeeding, contraceptive use, and adherence to maternal-infant care among pregnant and postpartum populations. Tested interventions include, but are not limited to, brief interventions, contingency management, cognitive behavioral therapy, peer and group support, additional to other forms of counseling, and pharmacological treatment such as bupropion. Treatment interventions generally provide education and referral information, nudge to focus on healthy practices, reinforcement on healthy behavior, and cognitive and behavioral exercises such as skill training, to increase the value of natural or contrived reinforcers to engage in healthy behavior. Comprehensive and combined intervention approaches are probably the most ideal for intervening with pregnant and postpartum populations to address intertwined health issues and social determinants that interact with each other. With under-resourced communities, healthcare settings, and workforces that deal with pregnant and postpartum populations, dissemination and sustainability of evidence-based interventions is another major challenge that we need to face. This presentation provides an overview of maternal health behavioral issues, some of the intervention studies, and challenges and efforts to overcome sustainability issues.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Professionals and students in obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, nursing, women’s health, substance use treatment, technology use, behavior science
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list WHO-defined maternal health behaviors that significantly contribute to female non-communicable diseases; (2) list at least two studies that used contingency management to improve maternal health behaviors; (3) list other forms of interventions to treat maternal health behaviors; (4) list future direction of maternal health behavior research introduced during the presentation.
 
YUKIKO WASHIO (RTI International)
Yukiko Washio is a researcher at Substance Use, Gender, and Applied Research of RTI International and an adjunct faculty at Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine. She consults in both the US and Japan for public health research and implementation using behavior analysis. She currently teaches behavior analysis at Capella University. Her research focus and interest are intervention development, adaptation, and testing to address persistent maternal health behavioral issues that tend to result in a major economic burden at the societal level. Her behavior analysis graduate and postdoctoral training thrives on development of behavioral interventions and professional network to expand research activities and dissemination.
 
 
Invited Panel #218
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Diversity submission Affirming Neurodiversity Inside Applied Behavior Analysis: Evolving Toward Inclusivity and Compassion
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
CE Instructor: Jonathan J. Tarbox, Ph.D.
Panelists: KRISTINE RODRIGUEZ (Autism Learning Partners), AMY GRAVINO (A.S.C.O.T Consulting), WORNER LELAND (Sex Ed Continuing Ed)
Abstract:

Neurodiversity is a concept that asserts that the idea of normal cognition is a false premise, based on the medical model of disability. Instead, neurodiversity, which was conceptualized by the neurodiverse individuals we serve, states that all humans are born with different cognitive strengths and skills and that difference in cognition is valuable and even important for human evolution and creativity. As applied to ABA, advocates in the neurodiversity movement have pushed for a more flexible, more compassionate, and less ablelist approach to ABA supports for autistic people. Some of the criticisms from the neurodiversity movement appear controversial to many in the ABA field and many behavior analysts have rejected the concerns and/or attempted to defend our field against neurodiversity. This panel discussion will engage in an honest, vulnerable, and frank discussion of the strengths and limitations of what we do in ABA and use the neurodiversity movement as an opportunity to discuss practical steps the ABA field can take to moving our field to a future of greater inclusivity, flexibility, and less ableism. The neurodiverse panel of presenters includes researchers, practitioners, family members, and advocates.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define neurodiversity; (2) define ableism; (3) describe simple strategies for centering autistic voices in ABA research and practice.
KRISTINE RODRIGUEZ (Autism Learning Partners)
AMY GRAVINO (A.S.C.O.T Consulting)
Amy Gravino, M.A., is an autism sexuality advocate and Relationship Coach in the Center for Adult Autism Services at Rutgers University. She is also the President of A.S.C.O.T Consulting, which offers autism consulting, college coaching, and mentoring services for organizations, schools, individuals on the autism spectrum, and their families. Amy is an international speaker who has given TED talks, spoken twice at the United Nations for World Autism Awareness Day, and presented worldwide to audiences on a variety of topics related to autism, with a dedicated special focus and research on the subject of autism and sexuality. Ms. Gravino obtained her Masters degree in Applied Behavior Analysis from Caldwell University in 2010 and currently serves on the Boards of Directors of Specialisterne USA, Yes She Can, Inc. and the Golden Door International Film Festival of Jersey City, as well as the Scientific Advisory Board of Simons Foundation Powering Autism Research (SPARK). She is an award-winning writer whose work has been featured in Spectrum, the leading online news source for autism research, Reader’s Digest, special education textbooks, and other outlets. Visit www.amygravino.com to learn more.
WORNER LELAND (Sex Ed Continuing Ed)
Worner Leland, MS, BCBA, is an agender, neurodivergent human, a former researcher and educator with Upswing Advocates, a current educator with Sex Ed Continuing Ed, and an organizer with the annual SexABA Conference. Their work focuses on assent and consent education, harm reduction and coercion reduction education in behavior analysis, and maximizing autonomy and access to appetitives. Worner is also a past President and past Research and Dissemination Liaison of the ABAI Sexual Behavior Research and Practice SIG.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #234
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diversity submission Extending the Reach of Applied Behavior Analysis to Health and Social Justice Domains
Sunday, May 29, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: BPN; Domain: Theory
Chair: August F. Holtyn (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
CE Instructor: Bethany R. Raiff, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: BETHANY R. RAIFF (Rowan University)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis has been successfully disseminated in the domains of autism and developmental disabilities. Although the science and technology of behavior analysis is relevant and is being used effectively in other domains such as health and addiction, these areas receive less attention in the field and do not have clear career pathways. I will review a wide range of applications of applied behavior analysis within these less well-known domains, such as addiction, physical activity, diabetes management, and social justice. Finally, I will discuss potential barriers to the dissemination of applied behavior analysis within these domains, along with some potential next steps.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Anyone interested in broadening the reach of ABA
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss how applied behavior analysis has been used in areas outside of autism and developmental disabilities; (2) identify at least two reasons why applied behavior analysis is not being applied more widely in these other domains; (3) explain at least two steps that would need to occur for the successful extension of applied behavior analysis to these non-traditional domains.
 
BETHANY R. RAIFF (Rowan University)
Dr. Raiff graduated from the University of Florida in 2008 with her Ph.D. in Psychology, with an emphasis in Behavioral Pharmacology. She worked as a principal investigator for four years at the National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. in New York City before moving to the Department of Psychology at Rowan University in 2012 where she is currently a Full Professor and the Director of the Health and Behavioral Integrated Treatments (HABIT) Research Unit. Dr. Raiff's primary research interests include developing and evaluating the integration of technological innovations with behavioral economic interventions addressing a wide array of topics, including smoking, opioid use disorder, physical activity, diabetes management, and social justice. Dr. Raiff has been the recipient of numerous NIH grants to develop and evaluate smartphone and technology delivered contingency management interventions. She serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and is the current President of the Division 25 of the American Psychological Association.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #238A
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Award for Distinguished Contributions to DEI: Equitable Supervision Practices
Sunday, May 29, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: DEI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Ramona Houmanfar, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: DANYELLE BEAL (Loving Hands Family Support Services)
Abstract:

Representing the Black Applied Behavior Analysts (BABA)--recipient of the 2022 Award for Distinguished Contributions to DEI--Danyelle Beal will present on equitable supervision practices.

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) demographic data reports that approximately 40% of the certificants are Black, Indigenous, or People of Color (BIPOC) individuals. The BACB has added items to support equitable supervision practices which will come into effect in 2025 under the 6th edition task list. One of the new task list items specifies that supervisors are required to identify and implement methods that promote equity in supervision practices. BIPOC individuals are especially at risk of being affected by inequitable supervision practices given much of the behavior analytic leadership is White and may not have previously had training on appropriate strategies that will reduce these inequities for BIPOC supervisees. The mission of BABA is to create a safe community to support, encourage and uplift Black professionals in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. Since BABA's inception, our focus has been to shed light on the inequities that have marginalized our community for far too long while creating opportunities for growth, advancement and leadership for clinicians of color. It is vital that the responsibility of cultural responsiveness is shared by the field of ABA in its entirety. Thus, the purpose of this presentation will be to discuss how current supervisor practices could contribute to inequities, identify common barriers in supervisor practices, and provide some examples of solutions which could promote equitable supervision practices.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Clinicians and supervisors who work directly with clinicians of color

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) reflect on current supervision practices; (2) identify common barriers in supervisory practices for BIPOC supervisees; (3) provide examples of how they can establish equitable supervision opportunities with BIPOC supervisees.
 
DANYELLE BEAL (Loving Hands Family Support Services)
The mission of BABA is to create a safe community to support, encourage and uplift Black professionals in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis
 
 
Invited Symposium #244
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Practitioner Experiences With Telehealth Across the World
Sunday, May 29, 2022
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau (Flamboyan Behavioral Services)
Discussant: Kelly M. Schieltz (University of Iowa)
CE Instructor: Kelly M. Schieltz, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many behavior analysts who serve individuals with developmental disabilities had to transform their practice swiftly using telehealth in order to continue supporting their clients. In this international symposium, we invited practitioners from across the world who adapted their services to telehealth to share their experiences. Smita Awasthi will present a study that reports how Behavior Momentum India shifted their in-clinic services across their 10 clinics in India to in-home telehealth during the pandemic using smartphones. Guido D’Angelo will present a study conducted in Italy through their agency, Dalla Luna, in which telehealth supervision was provided to two therapists in conducting functional analysis and functional communication training. Kristín Guðmundsdóttir, from University of Akureyri, will present a study in which the authors developed and implemented a telehealth parent training protocol with 5 families in rural Iceland before the pandemic despite challenges such as low-speed internet access. Iris Heidsha Pons from Starbright Academy in Puerto Rico will share her experiences shifting to telehealth during the pandemic for a school and clinic that serves over 200 individuals. Presenters will share cultural variables they considered, barriers they faced, and will present recommendations for other professionals implementing behavior analysis through telehealth.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how smartphones can be used to teach skills typically taught in IBI programs for children with ASD; (2) describe the three models of tele-health service delivery; (3) discuss scaling up behavior analytic services beyond the horizon; (4) describe ethical challenges in transitioning services to telehealth; (5) idenitfy adaptation to therapists’s supervision via telehealth; (6) describe how to implement functional assessment and FCT via telehealth; (7)state critical components of an evidence-based telehealth behavioral caregiver training with families of young children with autism, using a low-speed internet connection; (8) state and discriminate between possible procedural, technological, ethical and cultural challenges during behavioral caregiver training; (9) state critical training components for higher and continuing education in behavioral caregiver consultation via telehealth in low-speed internet connection; (10) describe how telemedicine was used to work with children with ASD in Puerto Rico to deliver education-based ABA during the pandemic.
 

Using the Ubiquitous Smartphone to Deliver Behavior Analytic Telehealth Services: An Indian Organizations Response During the Pandemic

(Service Delivery)
SMITA AWASTHI (Behavior Momentum India), Sridhar Aravamudhan (Behavior Momentum India), Anupama Jagdish (Behavior Momentum India (BMI)), Bhavana Joshi (Behavior Momentum India (BMI)), Papiya Mukherjee (Behavior Momentum India (BMI)), Rajeshwari Kalkivaya (Behavior Momentum India (BMI)), Razia Shahzad Ali (Behavior Momentum India (BMI)), Sonika Srivastava (Behavior Momentum India (BMI)), Sreemon Edasserykkudy (Behavior Momentum India (BMI))
Abstract:

Telehealth services have been applied in the treatment of a variety of problems across geographies (Tsami et al., 2019). The COVID-19 pandemic provided such an opportunity to scale up the impact of behavior analysis for children with autism when in-clinic services stopped abruptly worldwide. This qualitative and quantitative case study details how Behavior Momentum India (BMI), an organisation with 10 clinics across India transitioned services from in clinic to telehealth using the ubiquitous smartphone. A cohort of 92 students diagnosed with autism participated in this study under a team of 51 therapists, 9 behavior supervisors, and a doctoral-level Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Smartphones were used by 78% students and 82% therapists for direct 1:1 and parent-mediated sessions with 82 students. With 10 students, behavior supervisors provided parent training to continue interventions during lockdown. The critical transition decisions, logistics, and ethical challenges were identified using qualitative methods. All students continued to acquire targeted skills, while 52% of the students acquired more skills in telehealth compared to in clinic as per curriculum modification. A social validity survey provided high ratings on our organization’s initiative, and 72% parents reported that their familiarity and confidence with the science of applied behavior analysis had increased.

Dr. Smita Awasthi is a psychologist, behavioral scientist, and a BCBA-D. She completed her Master’s in Psychology in 1986, and earned her Ph.D. from Queen’s University Belfast, Ireland, in 2017. Dr. Awasthi started her career on a UNICEF project in community-based rehabilitation of people with special needs and has devoted 36 years of her professional career working across the lifespan with individuals and families affected by autism and other developmental disabilities. Dr. Awasthi founded Behavior Momentum India in 2010 and pioneered 1:1 behavior analytic services in India. She currently serves as its Executive Director and CEO. Today BMI is the largest autism intervention center outside the United States. With eight intervention centers and a team of behavior analysts and 200+ para-professionals, the agency provides intensive behavior analytic treatment to 350 pediatric and adolescent populations with autism spectrum disorder from India and abroad.
 
Supervision of Therapists and Families via Telehealth: An Italian Experience
(Service Delivery)
GUIDO D'ANGELO (DALLA LUNA - BARI)
Abstract: The dramatic effect of COVID-19 at the beginning of 2020 in Italy has forced the educational agencies to rapidly reorganize the provision of educational services, moving from an in vivo to a telehealth modality. Although in the international context there is wide evidence of the effectiveness of this approach, only a recent handful of studies have begun to research its application in the Italian context. This study investigates the effectiveness of telehealth therapists’ supervision in the context of two functional communication training (FCT) interventions for two children with autism spectrum disorder. Telehealth supervision was provided first to the therapists and then to the families of the children. The FCT was conducted following the functional analysis implemented by therapists, who had never received specific training on this procedure before. Subsequently, the family implemented an intervention through telehealth for the generalization of the previously taught skills within the home context. In this presentation we present the findings of both our initial and subsequent analyses, and eventually discuss their implications.
Guido D'Angelo is an internationally certified behavior analyst since 2016. He has been working for over 17 years with children and teens with autism and their families. He has been invited as a speaker at 17 national and international conferences on the topics of autism and psychology. He has published 13 books and scientific articles in the psychological field, on autism and other developmental disorders.
 

Rural Behavioral Consultation in Iceland Pre-COVID-19 Pandemic: Effects of Caregiver Training Via Telehealth on Child and Family Progress and Considerations for Training and Professional Practice

(Service Delivery)
KRISTÍN GUDMUNDSDOTTIR (University of Akureyri)
Abstract:

This paper presents the development and experimental evaluation of telehealth methods in behavioral caregiver training in rural Iceland pre COVID-19 pandemic. Lessons learned from the study will be described and considerations for professional training and practice in behavioral telehealth for families of children with autism will be discussed. The study was conducted with Icelandic families of preschool-aged children with autism that did not have access to evidence-based services. The experimental design was a multiple baseline across parent and child skills, replicated across 5 families. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected for experimental and social validity purposes. Caregivers were taught to apply the TeachingDANCE (Ala‘i-Rosales, Cermak og Guðmundsdóttir, 2013) during play interaction with their children in order to teach their children social communication skills and enhance the quality of the relationship between the parent and child. The majority of the training was conducted through telecommunication methods. The results showed measurable progress for parents and children across all skill areas. Furthermore, the caregivers valued the increased access to evidence-based intervention and expertise, despite various challenges during the intervention. The results indicated that training via telecommunication is a viable approach for rural families with low-speed internet connection. Critical training components for higher and continuing education will be highlighted and recommendations for professional training and practice will be discussed in the context of the research as well as the lessons learned. These recommendations include considerations regarding technical skills, effective training procedures, ethical and cultural considerations, and challenges when conducting data-based behavioral consultation via telecommunication.

Kristín Guðmundsdóttir is an Assistant Professor in Psychology at the University of Akureyri, Iceland. Kristín holds a Doctoral degree in psychology from the University of Iceland and a Master of Science degree in behavior analysis from the University of North Texas. She is also a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) since 2003. Kristín has served as the President of Icelandic ABA and has been an active participant in the shaping of behavior analysis in Iceland. Kristín has worked as a therapist and case manager in early behavior intervention for young children with autism and other developmental disabilities in Iceland and the US. She also has extensive experience teaching and consulting with children and caregivers in the Icelandic school system, specifically in rural parts of Iceland. Kristín’s current research focus includes behavior intervention for families of young children with autism and other developmental disabilities via telehealth. Specific emphasis is on caregiver training for rural families that have limited access to evidence-based services.

 

Telemedicine in Puerto Rico: A New Challenge During the Pandemic to Deliver Clinical and Educational Applied Behavior Analysis to Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders

(Service Delivery)
IRIS HEIDSHA PONS (Starbright Academy)
Abstract:

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on the education, family, and social aspects of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in Puerto Rico. Starbright Academy serves 116 individuals from the ages of 2-21 years in our school program and 101 individuals with ASD and other related disorders in our clinical program (MO Therapy). The pandemic challenged us to transfer our educational and clinical system from face-to-face to a virtual one. Within 5 weeks of the initial “shut down” in 2020, Starbright had converted all of our in-person services to telehealth. We conducted academic and clinical programs through telemedicine for 76 children for 10 months. In this discussion I will share the lessons learned during this transition. Specifically, I will discuss how telemedicine has had a positive impact in educating all family members in ABA techniques, the significant improvements we have seen in the well-being of the family threw the application of telehealth in these homes, the development of independence skills and the generalization of other skills learned at school into the home setting. I will also share the obstacles that we faced in Puerto Rico for receiving ABA services, other challenges encountered during this transition to telehealth and provide recommendations for future providers.

 
 
Invited Symposium #249
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Dismantling Ableism From Your Practice
Sunday, May 29, 2022
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
Discussant: Cailey M M Rodgers (Integrated Therapy Solutions)
CE Instructor: Cailey M Rodgers, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Ableism involves stereotypes (biased verbal behavior) and discriminatory actions against disabled people. Ableism results from the assumption that there is a normative way of living that is superior and that being disabled reflects deficits in need of “fixing,” and are thus, inferior. The Practice Board of ABAI developed a “Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in Your Practice” in recognition of the fact that ableism is ubiquitous in helping professions, and behavior analysis is no exception. Behavior analysts have a particularly heavy responsibility for dismantling ableism given the large number of contact hours they have with Autistic clients and the immediate and long-term problems resulting from this form of discrimination. This symposium will include the perspective of four behavior analysts contributing to the development of the “Beginner’s Guide” and will reflect their perspectives and barriers they have experienced as activists--including that of an Autistic, a doctoral student, a professor, and a Board Coordinator. The symposium will conclude with discussion from a neurodivergent behavior analyst who has not been involved in the development of the “Beginner’s Guide;” she will reflect on ways this and additional work is needed to actualize a paradigm shift in ABA.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define ableism; (2) explain why dismantling ableism is important in ABA; (3) describe how ableism powerfully impacts the roles of students, professors, and Autistics.
 
Diversity submission 

Ableism and ABA: I Have Caused Harm

SHAWNNA SUNDBERG (Ball State University)
Abstract:

Studying behavior analysis involves a love for the science as well as a drive to support others. With the growing awareness of ableism and applied behavior analysis (ABA) as abuse, students are faced with challenging information and are required to navigate through the controversy in the field. It is critically important to inform these future practitioners and leaders in the field what ableism is and how to actively dismantle it in their practice. Ableist beliefs are present in everyone due to our society’s continuous reinforcement whether in the media (i.e. infantilizing, dehumanization) or in or taught in educational settings. The Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in Your Practice is an introduction to these issues and a way to listen to Autistic voices. Listening to Autistic voices is essential to dismantling ableism in ABA. Learning that you have discriminated and caused harm can be an overwhelming realization. Students must learn how to move forward and practice using true client centered care and make the changes in the field that the people we support so desperately need from us.

Shawnna received a B.A. in Psychology from Purdue University in 2008, and a M.A. in Special Education with Certifications in ABA and Autism from Ball State University in 2015. Shawnna is a board certified behavior analyst (BCBA) with over 13 years of experience working in the mental health and ABA/VB field. Shawnna is currently a Ph.D. student in special education at Ball State University where she will be completing her dissertation on prompting methods to reduce ableism used to support Autistic students. She focuses both her clinical and research efforts on dismantling ableism and ABA reform as well as training other behavior analysts and parents on issues of social justice-diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of ABA. She has a special interest in sexuality education for Autistics. Previously in her career, Shawnna was a parent training coordinator focusing supporting families in home. In addition, Shawnna was the 2018-2019 Hoosier Association for Behavior Analysis Secretary assisting with licensure for BCBAs in the state of Indiana. She has published two chapters on using interventions with Autistic children and three peer-reviewed chapters accepted for publication that focus on sexuality education, self-management, and college alternatives for transition-aged Autistic students.
 
Diversity submission 

Considerations for Academic Training Programs

JENNIFER J. MCCOMAS (University of Minnesota)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysts possess deep knowledge and strong skills in teaching desired behavior and addressing interfering behavior of individuals with a wide variety of needs. However, at least two issues interfere with practitioners’ ability to engage effectively with the people they aim to support. First, individual practitioners bring their own beliefs, values, and attitudes to their practice, yet their beliefs, values, and attitudes will inevitably vary from those of the people they serve. Second, applied behavior analytic practitioners have historically approached their work in a very technocratic manner – as elite technical experts. Behavior analytic practitioners must attend to these two issues and adjust their approach if they wish to achieve their aim of providing effective supports. Actively working to dismantle ableism is one approach to addressing these two issues, and training programs bear responsibility to teach aspiring behavior analysts how to think, talk about, and treat the people they serve and support in anti-ableist ways. I will discuss infusing a training program with instruction and practice in the use of anti-ableist attitudes, language, and practice.

Jennifer J. McComas, Ph.D., is Professor of Special Education and holds the Rodney S. Wallace Professor for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning Endowed Chair at the University of Minnesota and faculty lead of the Collaborative Action for Radical Equity in Applied Behavior Analysis (CARE ABA) lab. Her research focuses on systematic and individualized analysis and intervention for academic and social behavior. She co-coordinates the University of Minnesota Master’s program in special education with an emphasis in applied behavior analysis, recently co-authored a chapter titled, “Beyond Cultural Responsivity: Applied Behavior Analysis Through a Lens of Cultural Humility,” and co-authored ABAI Practice Guidelines, “Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in ABA Practice: Where Do We Go From Here?”
 
Diversity submission 

Activism and Life-Long Learning

SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University)
Abstract:

The Practice Board redefined our mission in 2020 as, “The mission of Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA is to recommend systemic changes to ABAI and leaders in the field of applied behavior analysis regarding how best to meet the needs of the people we serve. We maintain that anti-ableist, person-centered services that promote meaningful outcomes through socially valid and effective intervention is the means to achieving this mission. We further recommend reflection, honesty, and effective communication regarding the strengths and limitations of evidence regarding the utility and adverse side effects of all interventions applied by behavior analysts.” The Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in Your Practice is consistent with that mission and collaborating on this work with Practice Board members learning from Autistics who are outside the field of ABA led to growth opportunities. For example, I had learned that White people need to do the heavy lifting for producing systems change with respect to social justice and race because they (we) had created the structures that produce marginalization. I incorrectly generalized this thinking to the development of The Beginner’s Guide by having only one Autistic person on the original group writing the document. However, this decision violated the trust of the Autistic community by not sufficiently addressing the need for representation. This presentation will focus on lessons learned and the need for self-reflection and reconsideration of our positions as we all consider how to dismantle ableism in our practice and field.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #292
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Feeding Two Birds With One Scone: Connecting Animal Welfare Concepts With Behaviour Analysis
Sunday, May 29, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Erica N. Feuerbacher (Virginia Tech)
CE Instructor: Alexandra Protopopova, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ALEXANDRA PROTOPOPOVA (The University of British Columbia)
Abstract: Scientists and practitioners in applied animal behaviour analysis frequently work in animal welfare, management, and protection fields. Yet, the verbal behaviour within the scientific discipline of animal welfare science is often at odds with the verbal behaviour of behaviour analysts. In this talk, I draw from my own experiences from working with colleagues in animal welfare science as well as working in animal shelter settings to outline some commonalities and differences in verbal behaviour and recommend some ways to reconcile the differences to allow for effective communication across disciplines. I will outline how different disciplines place different emphasis on the importance of various concepts, such as affective states, consent, choice, cognition, etc., and propose possible solutions to reconcile these differing emphases. I will also argue that a clearer distinction between “procedure” and “behavioural process” will allow for easier communication to not only scientists but also practitioners of animal welfare. After this talk, I hope that listeners will be able to more easily connect verbal behaviour of the discipline of animal welfare science to their own work; likewise, I hope that listeners will improve their own verbal behaviour to not only aid interdisciplinary communication but to also allow for the inclusion of novel concepts to guide our work in improving animal lives.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Scientists and practitioners working with non-human animals in applied settings.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify which features of behaviour are important to scientists and practitioners of animal welfare; (2) list common assessments of animal welfare, and how these assessments relate to behaviour analysis; (3) identify why differentiating between “procedure” and “process” is additionally important in reconciling the two disciplines; (4) consider the utility of incorporating verbal behaviour from other disciplines to aid in their research and/or practice with non-human animals.
 
ALEXANDRA PROTOPOPOVA (The University of British Columbia)
Dr. Alexandra (Sasha) Protopopova, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Animal Welfare Program at the University of British Columbia and the NSERC/ BC SPCA Industrial Research Chair in Animal Welfare. Sasha’s research aims are to learn more about dogs, improve animal shelter practices, improve companion animal welfare in shelters, pet homes, and in assistance roles--all within a One Welfare framework. Recently, Sasha has been shifting her research focus on connecting climate change and other societal issues to companion animal welfare. Sasha earned an MSc and a Ph.D. in Behavior Analysis from the University of Florida with Drs. Clive Wynne and Brian Iwata. She spends her days conducting research, teaching university classes in animal learning and animal sheltering, going on hiking trails, and cuddling dogs.
 
 
Invited Panel #299
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Ableism and the Social Model of Disability: What Does it Have to do With Behavior Analysts?
Sunday, May 29, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Summer Bottini (May Institute)
CE Instructor: Summer Bottini, Ph.D.
Panelists: DOROTHEA C. LERMAN (University of Houston-Clear Lake), STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University), ANDREW HALL (Pyles and Associates)
Abstract:

Recipients of behavior analytic services have traditionally been viewed through a medical model lens that treats deficits. Alternatively, a social model of disability views societal barriers and systemic biases as limiting people with disabilities’ ability to thrive and meet their own needs/wants. Some disciplines have increasingly acknowledged this social conceptualization of disability and begun to adopt more equitable language and practices across research and practice. In both research and practice, behavior analysts have generally have not ascribed to a social model of disability, perhaps contributing to ongoing negative perceptions of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in some communities. This panel will begin with a brief overview of terms and concepts relevant to equity in behavior analysis and disability research. Our panel will then discuss these concepts as they relate to ethical research and practice in ABA. Namely, the panel will (1) discuss the importance of considering these concepts as diversity issues in practice, (2) identify indicators of ableism in ABA research and discourse, and (3) consider how subtle ableism may influence behavior analytic interventions. Last, the panel will discuss initial steps behavior analysts may take to challenge their own assumptions and support equity for people with disabilities in our field.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Trainees, direct-care therapists, and active certified behavior analysts at the masters or doctoral level. Individuals that provide/supervise clinical services, consume research, and/or contribute to the empirical literature may benefit from this session.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define ableism and the social model of disability as it relates to research and practice in behavior analysis; (2) identify behaviors and permanent products that reflect ableism in behavior analytic research; (3) state at least two behaviors that behavior analysts should engage in to promote ethical and equitable care of disabled people or those with developmental delays
DOROTHEA C. LERMAN (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Dorothea Lerman is currently a Professor of Behavior Analysis at the University of Houston - Clear Lake, where she chairs the master’s program in behavior analysis and serves as Director of the UHCL Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities (CADD). She received her doctoral degree in Psychology from the University of Florida, specializing in behavior analysis. Her areas of expertise include autism, developmental disabilities, early intervention, functional analysis, teacher and parent training, and treatment of severe behavior disorders. She currently oversees several programs at CADD, including a focused intervention program for children with autism, a vocational program for adults with disabilities, a student support program for college students with autism, and a teacher training program for local school districts. Dr. Lerman has published more than 100 research articles and chapters, served as Editor-in-Chief for The Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and has secured more than $2 million in grants and contracts to support her work. She was the recipient of the 2007 Distinguished Contribution to Applied Behavioral Research Award and the 2001 B.F. Skinner Award for New Researchers, awarded by Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She also was named a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis-International in 2008. Dr. Lerman is a Licensed Behavior Analyst and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.
STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University)
Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D. is Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Western Michigan University. She earned her doctorate in Special Education at The University of Iowa in 1994. She is also Professor of Psychology and the previous chair of the Department of Psychology. Previously, she taught at Gonzaga University, Utah State University, The Ohio State University, and Idaho State University. Her primary research interests are helping to decrease chronic severe behavior problems in children with developmental disabilities. Specifically, she studies choice making in the treatment of problem behavior, functional communication training, reinforcement-based interventions for children with problem behavior, concurrent schedules of reinforcement in the treatment of severe problem behavior, functional analysis of problem behavior, and teleconsultation. She also has interests in applications of behavior analysis to educational interventions and teacher/behavior analyst training. She has served on a variety of editorial boards, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and is currently the editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice. She also served as a Senior Editor for Education and Treatment of Children for many years. She served two 3-year terms on the Board of Directors for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and was appointed by the Governor of Michigan to the Michigan Board of Behavior Analysts, Michigan’s licensing board for behavior analysts. She served as the President of the Board for two years.
ANDREW HALL (Pyles and Associates)
 
 
Invited Symposium #326
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Ableism, Professional Growth, and the Task Force for Quality and Values-Based Applied Behavior Analysis
Sunday, May 29, 2022
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago)
CE Instructor: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D.
Abstract:

In the summer of 2021, ABAI pulled together a team of professionals and created the Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA. This symposium begins with an overview of the Task Force and then brings together three members of the Task Force to discuss the topic of ableism and how that connects to the mission of the Task Force. This symposium discusses the importance of behavior analysts with different views about social justice--diversity, equity, and inclusion convening to discuss the topic of ableism so that we can all begin making substantive changes to the practice of ABA without sacrificing the technical precision that supports skill development in areas identified as important by Autistic clients. Each presenter will address how involvement with the Task Force has changed their views on ableism, their role in the field, or pivotal growth opportunities that have helped them evolve as behavior analysts. Reconsideration of the ways social validity should influence professional decision-making, an emphasis on compassionate care, the need to provide person-centered behavior analytic services, and the myriad ways behavior analysts should challenge their own assumptions as providers will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define the purpose of the Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA; (2) explain why each behavior analyst needs to collaborate with others to gain insights and grow around the topic of ableism; (3) describe at least one form of ableism in their practice that they can begin discussing with behavior analytic colleagues.
 
Diversity submission 

Ableism: From the Journey Without to the Journey Within

AMY GRAVINO (A.S.C.O.T Consulting)
Abstract:

As an Autistic adult and member of the ABAI Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA, I have had the opportunity to bring a unique perspective to the Task Force’s work. My journey as a professional working in the field of ABA has dovetailed with my journey as a person on the autism spectrum understanding my own internalized ableism, and mention will be made of how each of these spheres work to inform the other. Emphasis will also be placed on the challenges faced as a member of the Task Force in overcoming the idea of my presence as an “other” in the group and the difficulties I experienced based on my own learning history. Engagement with and attitudes toward Autistic people influence the willingness of BCBAs to confront ableism and ultimately make changes to the culture of the field at large will be discussed. Examples of efforts that have been made to encourage dialogue between BCBAs and Autistic advocates will also be discussed, as well as the successes and limitations of these efforts.

 
Diversity submission 

Ableism: What's That Have to Do With Me? Some Reflections on a 50-year Journey as a Behavior Analyst

GORDON BOURLAND (Trinity Behavioral Associates)
Abstract:

As a person identifying as a behavior analyst for over 50 years, I have observed from a behavior analytic perspective many changes in my behavior, the scope and sophistication of behavior analysis, and in society in the United States during the time of that journey. Sometimes those changes are obvious and recognition of them unavoidable; at other times, they are noticed after comments by others or after times of personal reflection. Mention will be made of some relevant substantial changes in behavior analysis and in society at large as will changes in my personal perspective and practice as a behavior analyst during this 50-year journey. Particular emphasis will be given to changes in my personal and professional perspectives regarding persons said to have disabilities as well as persons whose behavior varies from what is commonly expected in society in the United States. One group of people regarding whom I have experienced and continue to experience changes in my perspective is the very homogeneous group of people identifying or identified as Autistic. As a member of the ABAI Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA, my thinking and behavior regarding the latter people, including regarding ableism, have changed and continue to change at an accelerated rate. Instances of the latter set of changes will be discussed.

Gordon Bourland completed his Ph.D. in General-Experimental Psychology at the University of Texas Arlington. Subsequently he was a Postdoctoral Fellow in Behavioral Psychology at the John F. Kennedy Institute (now Kennedy-Krieger Institute) of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in Texas. For over 40 years he has held a variety of clinical and administrative positions involving services for persons with a variety of needs in public and private settings, published a number of papers in behavior analytic journals, and participated in the editorial process for several professional journals. Currently, he is the owner and principal in Trinity Behavioral Associates, providing behavior analytic services to persons across the age span with a variety of needs and diagnoses and in a variety of settings. He has been an active member of the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis (TxABA) for over 30 years. He has been a member of the organization's Executive Council and twice elected President of the TxABA. Dr. Bourland has been the initial President of the TxABA Public Policy Group, Past President of the group, and now is a member of the Advisory Committee. He has been actively involved in activities promoting public policies related to behavior analysis in Texas, primarily licensure of behavior analysts. Following establishment of behavior analyst licensure in Texas in 2017, Dr. Bourland was appointed and continues as Presiding Officer of the Texas Behavior Analysis Advisory Board. In addition, Dr. Bourland has been active in the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI). In 1975, he attended the first convention of the Midwestern Association for Behavior Analysis that evolved into ABAI, with membership in the organization spanning over 40 years. His roles in ABAI include: Coordinator of the ABAI Affiliate Chapters Board from 2010-2016 and 2020-present; membership on the ABAI SIG Task Force; and Chair of the ABAI Licensing Committee that consults with ABAI Affiliate Chapters regarding licensure of behavior analysts.
 
Diversity submission 

Coordinating, Collaborating, Leading, and Learning

SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University)
Abstract:

Given the purpose of applied behavior analysis is to use our technology and principles to lead to socially meaningful improvements in quality of life, we should all be concerned with how ableism influences the way we interact with disabled people. According to the BACB, most behavior analysts serve Autistic clients, and Autistic clients often receive a large number of service hours. The Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA was convened, in large part, to identify and address some of the concerns raised about ableism in the practice of ABA. The need to coordinate and collaborate with others with whom you share differences of opinion have served as a growth opportunity for all Task Force members. But growth is always accompanied by some level of pain, and my role in the Task Force is no exception. For example, my effort to lead gave me insights into the differences between impact and intention that can cause pain based on the point of view of Autistics and neurotypical behavior analysts. Learning more about professional actions, I have historically taken that I have caused harm when I thought I was creating good, has also been painful. Balancing the need to regularly dedicate time to examine our own ableist thinking and actions with the self-care that is needed to maintain a long-term commitment to changing ableism in our practice, is challenging but critical for our success as a field.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #345
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Using Organizational Behavior Management to Develop Ethical and Effective Leaders and Supervisors
Sunday, May 29, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Byron J. Wine (The Faison Center; University of Virginia)
CE Instructor: Alicia M. Alvero, Please Select...
Presenting Author: ALICIA ALVERO (Queens College, CUNY)
Abstract:

“ABA techniques can be used to improve and target specific behavior.” Most would agree that this is a common statement among ABA practitioners. It often triggers thoughts of therapists and clients or classrooms and teachers—but the same exact statement can be used to describe the practice of OBM in organizations including the human service industry. This presentation will explore ways in which ABA techniques can improve ethical and effective leadership behaviors. It will also explore why it is critical for leaders and OBM practitioners to practice what they preach. Topics such as feedback, performance evaluation, training and creating an ethical culture will be explored.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: OBM students, practitioners, ABA supervisors, executive leadership of ABA agencies, BACBs serving as supervisors
Learning Objectives: PENDING
 
ALICIA ALVERO (Queens College, CUNY)
Alicia M. Alvero is the Associate Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs at Queens College, The City University of New York. She began her academic career at Queens College in 2003 as a professor of Organizational Behavior Management and she helped streamline workflow within the Department of Psychology to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of processes affecting students, staff and faculty. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Florida International University, her M.A. in Industrial-Organizational Psychology and her Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis from Western Michigan University (WMU). Dr. Alvero was awarded the prestigious Ford Foundation Fellowship while at WMU for her research in behavioral safety and the effects of safety observations. She has extensive experience teaching leaders across a number of domains, including human service agencies and higher education, how to utilize OBM to help solve organizational challenges and strengthen their leadership skills. She has published in various journals including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavior Analysis in Practice, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, and Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education and has served on several editorial boards. Dr. Alvero has been an invited speaker across the country and also serves as an organizational consultant in the areas of training, leadership, and performance management.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #346
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Don Baer Lecture: The Current Future of Behavior Analysis in Educational Settings
Sunday, May 29, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: PRA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Jennifer J. McComas (University of Minnesota)
CE Instructor: Janet S. Twyman, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JANET S. TWYMAN (blast)
Abstract:

In his 1988 chapter of a similar name, Don Baer described the then-current accomplishments of behavior-analytic approaches to public education. These included the ability to transform student and teacher behavior and refine curriculum; however rather than offer a laundry list of the ways behavior analysis has and could improve education, he instead reiterated the question he and Don Bushell asked seven years earlier: “Why hasn't behavior analysis done more?” Despite their incisive analysis of the school as an organization and the environment and cultural implications of change, almost 40 years later behavior analysts continue to lament a lack of widespread acceptance and use of behavior analysis in education. Perhaps our collective lamenting is misplaced. Perhaps behavior analysis is more pervasive in schools than we recognize. Perhaps we could do more by analyzing a network of contingencies--not just of education systems but of our own approaches. By fusing contingency analyses, education, and technologies (tools and processes), the current and future opportunities for behavior analysts are limitless.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts, educators, psychologists, school personnel, students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) characterize how contingency analyses (such as Baer and Bushell's 1981 analysis of systems) might be relevant to the impact of behavior analysis in schools today; (2) describe a current educational trend (e.g., competency-based education, embedded data-based decision making, artificial intelligence, machine learning) and how it relates to behavior analysis; (3) identify current and future opportunities for behavior analysis in the context of teaching and learning.
 
JANET S. TWYMAN (blast)
Dr. Janet Twyman is an educator, instructional designer, and founder of blast: A Learning Sciences Company. Always passionate about education, Janet has been a pre-school and public school teacher, administrator, researcher, and university professor. She currently holds a faculty appointment as Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and formerly served as Director of Innovation and Technology for the U.S. Dept of Education funded Center on Innovations in Learning, and as Vice President of Instructional Development, Research, & Implementation at Headsprout. Her numerous articles, book chapters, and presentations address behavior analysis, instructional design, technology, and educational systems, and include co-editing books on educational innovation, personalized learning, and equity. She has presented to and worked with education systems, organizations, and institutions over 60 states and countries, including speaking about technologies for diverse learners and settings at the United Nations. In 2007-08 she served as the President of the Association for Behavior Analysis and in 2014 was named an ABAI Fellow. For her distinguished contributions to educational research and practice she received the 2015 Wing Award for Evidence-based Education and the 2017 American Psychological Association Division 25 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education Award.
 

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