Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Program by Invited Events: Monday, May 30, 2022


 

Invited Symposium #421
CE Offered: BACB
The Importance of Timing in Behavior: An Appreciation of the Legacy of Russell Church
Monday, May 30, 2022
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Federico Sanabria (Arizona State University)
Discussant: Peter R. Killeen (Arizona State University)
CE Instructor: Peter R. Killeen, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium will discuss Russ Church’s research contributions and how the panelists have built on them in their own research to determine how to assess individual differences in timing abilities, the effects of environmental and pharmacological manipulations, and the neurobiology of timing.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Basic and translational investigators interested in applying MPR, board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe different procedures to measure accuracy of individuals’ ability to time events; (2) describe how timing research has been applied in several arenas; (3) describe potential areas where MPR might be applied; (4) describe oscillatory processes in timing research; (5) describe how judgments about the age of memories provide a non-episodic memory solution to putative episodic-memory studies; (6) describe fundamental principles of timing processes and their role in impulsive choices; (7) describe a new way of thinking about psychological models. 
 

Temporal Attention and Impulsive Choices

KIMBERLY KIRKPATRICK (Kansas State University)
Abstract:

Russell (Russ) Church was a dominant figure in the study of timing processes and how those processes influenced other cognitive processes. During my time as a post-doctoral fellow in his laboratory, Russ and I studied the role of timing processes in classical (Pavlovian) conditioning which led to the development of the Packet theory of timing and conditioning. My laboratory subsequently migrated to studying timing and impulsive choices, but there are multiple areas of our current research program where Russ’ influence is still apparent. This presentation will discuss recent research from my laboratory on the role of temporal attention and other timing processes in impulsive choice procedures in rats. Impulsive choice tasks present choices between a smaller-sooner and a larger-later reward, where the smaller-sooner is the impulsive choice. When rats were required to engage in active (versus passive) timing, they were more self-controlled, showed greater delay sensitivity, and demonstrated stronger preferences for the larger reward (when the delays were the same). The results suggest that tasks that engage temporal attention may be beneficial to reducing impulsive choices. Time-based interventions that involve repeated exposure to delays promoted self-control regardless of temporal attention demands. The interface of timing processes and impulsive choices can provide key insights into understanding the fundamental facets of the timing and decision-making systems.

Dr. Kimberly Kirkpatrick is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychological Sciences at Kansas State University. She directs the Reward, Timing, and Decision laboratory which is funded by a $1.9M grant from the National Institutes of Mental Health. She also directs the Cognitive and Neurobiological Approaches to Plasticity (CNAP) Center of Biomedical Research Excellence which was founded in 2017 through a $10.6M grant from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences. Kirkpatrick received the Kansas State Distinguished Graduate Faculty Award in 2018 and became a University Distinguished Professor in 2019. She currently serves on the ABAI Science Board. Dr. Kirkpatrick studies everyday choices which can lead to long-term health problems such as obesity, substance abuse, and other impulse control disorders. She has found that diets high in processed sugar and saturated fats can undermine self-control and lead individuals to develop a pattern of problematic daily choices, known as impulsive choices. She has also developed interventions to promote self-control as a treatment for impulsive choices, which is the topic of her current R01 grant. Kirkpatrick graduated with a bachelor’s in Psychology from Iowa State University. She completed her PhD at the University of Iowa in Psychology with a focus on Behavioral Neuroscience and then subsequently completed her post-doctoral training at Brown University. She started her career as a faculty member at the University of York (UK) before joining the faculty at Kansas State in 2008.
 

The Master Scientist of Timing Research: A Tribute to Russell Church

ARMANDO MACHADO (University of Aveiro, Portugal)
Abstract:

Russell Church contributed immensely to our understanding of Timing, the ability of animals and humans to discriminate intervals and durations of events. In this talk, I will analyze some of Church’s empirical studies, including his seminal “Bisection of Temporal Intervals”, and his theoretical models, from the influential Scalar Expectancy Theory to the more recent Modular Theory of Timing. I will also explain how Russell Church’s ideas and findings shaped our work on how animals learn to time.

Armando Machado obtained his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at Duke University. His research on the conditions in which pigeons generate highly variable, random-like behavior received the Annual Dissertation Award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. After his PhD, Armando joined Indiana University as an Assistant and then a tenured Associate professor. In 2000 he moved to the University of Minho where he became Full professor, and in 2019 he moved to the University of Aveiro. Armando’s research focuses on temporal learning, numerical discrimination, choice, and decision making in animals. In 2010 he received the Research Merit Award from the School of Psychology, and in 2014 he received the Scientific Merit Award from the University of Minho. He has served as Editor of the journal Behavior and Philosophy and Associate Editor of Psychonomic Bulletin & Review and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He was the President and Program Chair of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, and the first president of the Portuguese Association of Experimental Psychology.

 

 

How Rats Learn: An Unfinished Book

DAVID FREESTONE (William Paterson University)
Abstract:

By 2015, Russ Church decided to write a book that he never got a chance to finish. I was fortunate enough to be his coauthor. Its title—Temporal Conditioning: How Rats Learn—conveyed his view that timing and conditioning should be understood together. But the contents of the book conveyed a way of thinking about research that is so often left out of print. This talk will focus on Russ Church’s evolving views on animal behavior from 2005 to 2015, and where he hoped his ideas would lead. I’ll use this to describe how Russ thought about research—the flow from procedure to psychological model, and from model to evaluation.

David Freestone earned a Ph.D. in Russ Church’s lab in 2012. After a post-doc in neuroeconomics (NYU), he became a professor. His work focused on timing, conditioning, and value-based decision-making. These days, David works as a researcher and data scientist at a virtual eating disorder treatment center, and consults with animal facilities toward building robust data infrastructure to support the welfare of their animals.

 

Time, Memory, and the Legacy of Russ Church

JONATHAN CRYSTAL (University of Indiana)
Abstract:

In this presentation, I reflect on the impact Russ Church had on me and my research trajectory. I briefly describe my research on basic timing mechanisms. Next, I describe how timing research and immersion in the Church lab impacted my entry into research on memory. Finally, I describe the importance of time in the development of animal models of episodic memory.

Jonathon D. Crystal is Provost Professor at Indiana University in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences. He was a grad student in Russ Church's lab at Brown University from 1992 to 1997. 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #437
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Organizational Behavior Management: Where Systems Meet Culture
Monday, May 30, 2022
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Nicole Gravina (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Ingunn Sandaker, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: INGUNN SANDAKER (Oslo Metropolitan University/ OsloMet)
Abstract:

Systems may be formal or a result of self-organized selection of behaviors. We often talk about for instance a school system referring to the formal, planned and intentionally organized teaching and support services. A system may, however, as well arise without any formal structure, planning or intentionality. OBM, or the science of how to facilitate optimal contingencies for behaviors that serves the goals of the company, have to deal with both formal and informal functions, structures, and processes. These structures, whether visualized by an organization chart or a snapshot of network interactions, must also take culture into consideration. This presentation will show how the transmission of cultural practices over time influence both formal and informal systems.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Everyone interested in how organizations work, whether businesses or public sector.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) distinguish between a formal and an informal system; (2) to identify contingencies maintaining cultural practices in an organization; (3) analyze the functional relation between an organization, the processes maintaining the function, and the structure facilitating the processes.
 
INGUNN SANDAKER (Oslo Metropolitan University/ OsloMet)
Ingunn Sandaker, professor in the Department of Behavioral Science at Oslo Metropolitan University (OsloMet) in Norway, received her Ph.D. in organizational psychology from the University of Oslo in 1997. She has served in numerous roles, including as dean of studies for social work and special education at Oslo College, and as head of planning and development at Oslo HVPU (division of state services for those with developmental disabilities). She was project manager at OsloMet and instrumental in establishing its master’s and Ph.D. programs in behavior analysis; she has since been director of those programs. Combining expertise in both behavior analysis and systems design/analysis (behavior systems), she served as a consultant and advisor to major corporations, including Norway’s huge oil sector and the Norwegian Olympic Committee, where, as leadership training project director, she played a significant role in enhancing participation and awards for women athletes. Her efforts have helped secure behavior analysis as an established discipline in Norway. In addition, Professor Sandaker has been a leader in international dissemination, serving as the international representative to ABAI’s Executive Council. She is also on the editorial board of the Norwegian Journal of Behavior Analysis and associate editor of Perspectives on Behavior Science.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #453
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
A Social Justice Framework for Intervention
Monday, May 30, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Renee Hawkins (University of Cincinnati)
CE Instructor: Tai Collins, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: TAI COLLINS (University of Cincinnati)
Abstract:

As the school-age population continues to diversify, it is now more important than ever that we provide services with a social justice focus that recognizes and values individuals’ unique identities and dismantles systems of oppression and marginalization. With a particular focus on school-based intervention, we will discuss a social justice approach to service delivery. Implications for integrating an ecological-behavioral framework with a social justice approach informed by critical race theory, intersectionality, and dis/ability critical race studies will be discussed. We will discuss the adaptation of evidence-based interventions to fit various contexts, as well as the development of novel interventions built specifically for minoritized populations. We will also examine peer-mediated interventions as a promising suite of culturally relevant strategies.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students; faculty members
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) ? define social justice and articulate a social justice framework for intervention; (2) integrate the ecological-behavioral model with a social justice framework; (3) discuss the importance of theoretical foundations (e.g., critical race theory; intersectionality; dis/ability critical race studies) in the social justice framework; (4) identify methods of adapting evidence-based interventions to fit various populations; (5) identify interventions developed for specific populations.
 
TAI COLLINS (University of Cincinnati)
Tai A. Collins received his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in 2013. Dr. Collins is primarily interested in the development of time- and resource-efficient behavioral interventions to support Black students in urban schools with limited resources.  Dr. Collins has focused on developing peer-mediated interventions to improve the academic, behavioral, social, and emotional functioning of students within multi-tiered systems of support.  Dr. Collins is also interested in applications of a social justice framework in school psychology research, practice, and training. He currently teaches graduate courses including the Applied Behavior Analysis sequence, Advanced Behavioral Research Methods, and Working with Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Schools. 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #474
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Video Modelling to Teach Social and Play Skills to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 30, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Yanerys Leon (University of Miami)
CE Instructor: Christos Nikopoulos, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CHRISTOS NIKOPOULOS (Autism Consultancy Services, London)
Abstract:

Peer relations serve many important functions in children’s development. Social reciprocity or reciprocal peer interactions occur when children engage in social interactions with one another or when their actions support each other in their relationships. In autism spectrum disorder (ASD), however, reciprocity of social exchange is missing and is manifest as a lack of both social responses and initiations to other people. Over the years, various behavioral strategies have been developed to promote social interactions between children with ASD and their peers for a successful integration in inclusion settings. Video modelling, as one of them, is not only an effective and evidence-based method for developing many social and play skills, but it can also be a practical and efficient tool that is well-suited to the school environment. In this presentation, pertinent video modeling methodologies will be explored and specific suggestions on the effective use of video modeling will be provided.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Graduate students; RBTs; board certified behavior analysts (BCBA); board certified assistant behavior analysts (BCaBA); psychologists; therapists and special educators working in a variety of applied and experimental settings as well as educational and social science settings who are interested in the promotion of social and play skills in children with ASD.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the attendee will be able to: (1) name the salient features of video modeling procedures as guided by findings from the literature (e.g., with what ages video modeling can be effective, what intervention goals can be addressed by the implementation of video modeling, in which settings video modeling can be effectively used, etc.); (2) describe different types of video modeling and the advantages and disadvantages of each type when targeting social and play skills in children with ASD; (3) demonstrate step by step different types of video modeling (e.g., video modeling, self-modeling, priming modeling, point of view modeling) that could be designed and implemented.
 
CHRISTOS NIKOPOULOS (Autism Consultancy Services, London)
Dr. Christos Nikopoulos is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst (Doctoral Level; BCBA-D), former member of the Board of Directors of the BACB and of the European Association of Behaviour Analysis (EABA). He has served as a clinician, a University lecturer, an educator, a consultant, a researcher, and an author in the areas of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual and other developmental disabilities, as well as neurological and behavioural interventions in special education for more than 23 years. He is currently the founder and CEO of Autism Consultancy Services in London (UK) and Riyadh (KSA). He has obtained international experience in working with children with autism and other developmental disabilities--from 18 months old until adults--as well as their families and has published widely on the topic. Dr. Nikopoulos has co-authored two books and a few book chapters that have become key reference texts on subject of video modelling and autism and he has been chosen to deliver keynote speeches at international conferences quite frequently (more than 90 presentations at international conferences worldwide). Dr. Nikopoulos has also obtained substantial experience in the administration of a number of assessments tools as well as employing a variety of different behavioural procedures/methods, running home- and school-based intervention programmes in many European and Middle East countries. He is also either the Course Leader or the Lecturer of five BACB Verified Course Sequences (VCS) in Europe. Finally, due to his research activities and expertise in the area of autism, he has gained the award of Chartered Scientist from the Science Council, he is the scientific advisor for the Research Autism charity, an EU expert reviewer, as well as a reviewer for a number of international journals and governmental agencies.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #474A
CE Offered: BACB
Comprehensive Nutritional Interventions for Children and Adults with Autism
Monday, May 30, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Erin B. Rasmussen (Idaho State University)
CE Instructor: Jim Adams, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JIM ADAMS (Arizona State University)
Abstract:

Children and adults with ASD often have multiple nutritional and metabolic problems, including nutritional deficiencies, food intolerances, oxidative stress, decreased methylation, and impaired mitochondrial function. Many of these problems can be addressed by nutritional supplements and healthy allergen-free diets. A 12 month comprehensive nutritional intervention study was conducted to investigate the effect of combining 6 different nutritional interventions. The study found many benefits, including a 7 point gain in non-verbal IQ (compared to zero in the control group) and an 18 month gain in developmental age (vs 4 months in the control group). This suggests that many individuals with ASD can benefit from a comprehensive nutritional intervention to address underlying nutritional and metabolic problems.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBA’s and other professionals who work with children with ASD.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) learn the common nutritional and metabolic problems in children and adults with ASD; (2) understand the effect of comprehensive nutritional intervention on ASD symptoms; (3) learn which nutritional interventions were most important.
 
JIM ADAMS (Arizona State University)
James B. Adams, Ph.D., is the Director of the Autism/Asperger's Research Program at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the medical causes of autism and how to treat and prevent it including the areas of nutrition (vitamins/minerals, essential fatty acids, carnitine, digestive enzymes, special diets), oxidative stress, gut problems, gut bacteria, toxic metals, and seizures. He has published over 150 peer-reviewed scientific articles, including over 50 related to autism. He is also the President of the Autism Society of Greater Phoenix, the President of the Autism Nutrition Research Center, the co-leader of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Autism Research Institute, and chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Neurological Health Foundation. He has an adult daughter with autism.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #476
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Motivation and Self-Regulation and Health Behavior Promotion
Monday, May 30, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Vivian F Ibanez (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Paula Magalhaes, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: PAULA MAGALHAES (Universidade do Minho, Portugal)
Abstract:

Health behavior promotion in childhood has been dominated by knowledge-centered paradigms. However, research shows that beliefs about what is healthy have a stronger influence on behavior than factual knowledge. Motivation and self-regulation frameworks highlight the agent role of the individual in controlling the personal, behavioral, and environmental influences that impact one’s behavior. Although individuals may be influenced and regulated by external factors and agents, exclusively relying on external regulation does not allow the individual to develop adaptive competences and skills, such as choosing a healthy snack. The aim of this presentation is to describe how healthy habits in childhood can be promoted, including diet and sleep, through the modelling of self-regulation skills via story-tools/narrative-based programs.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Anyone interested in motivation and self-regulation, and health behavior promotion

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify motivational components of health behavior; (2) describe the core components of empirically supported story-tools/ narrative-based programs to model and promote Self-regulation skills for health; (3) discuss what and how children learn the self-regulation competences for health behavior.
 
PAULA MAGALHAES (Universidade do Minho, Portugal)
Paula Magalhães is a researcher at the Psychology Research Center, Universidade do Minho, Portugal. She earned her PhD in Psychology in 2014, focused on the experimental analysis of behavior, with animal models, at the University of Otago, New Zealand, under the supervision of Professor K. Geoffrey White. Since then, she has directed her efforts into an applied psychology research path. In 2014, she was invited to an Assistant Professor position, at Universidade do Minho, and, later on, received Post-Doctoral training at the same university focusing on developing and implementing intervention programs aiming at promoting self-regulation skills via the use of story-tools/ narratives. Her current research focuses on health behavior promotion through self-regulation (e.g., healthy eating, sleep, exercise). She is also interested in the use of Gamification to engage individuals in health behavior interventions. She has already been awarded a research grant as a PI on these topics “In-person and Online Healthy Eating Promotion through Self-regulation: Assessing the Efficacy of a Narrative-based Intervention.”
 
 
Invited Paper Session #491
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission The Ethical Debate in the Proposition of Cultural Design
Monday, May 30, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
Chair: Kathryn M. Roose (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Camila Muchon De Melo, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CAMILA MUCHON DE MELO (Universidade Estadual de Londrina (Londrina State University))
Abstract: Culturo-behavior science has been especially dedicated in the last decades to proposing conceptual tools to subsidize interventions that can produce broader impacts on cultures. Since Skinner (e.g., 1948; 1971) there has been a concern that the planning of cultural practices, or of a culture as a whole, should seek a balance between individual goods and cultural goods. Forward-thinking cultures should consider their strengthening as a value, or as the objective of a planning. However, working with cultural practices poses challenges to behavior analysts. This is because cultural practices involve behaviors of many people, interlocking behaviors, often under the control of very different variables. In the field of ethics, it is discussed that social control is largely exercised by control agencies. Agencies, in turn, when handling cultural contingencies generate strengthening consequences for the institution itself, that is, they often operate only for their own benefit. These are some of the elements of the ethical debate that permeate the tension between the descriptive and prescriptive aspects of radical behaviorism. Therefore, this lecture will have the following objectives: (1) to present the possibility of an ethical system based on the philosophical commitments of radical behaviorism; (2) conceptualize the cultural designs and present the challenges of the designs in its technological and ethical aspects; (3) present a community extension project carried out in a Brazilian city, by volunteer behavior analysts, to face the COVID-19 pandemic--an example of cultural intervention driven by values consistent with a radical behavioristic ethics.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Behavior analysts interested in an ethical issues based on radical behaviorism and interested in cultural designs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify ethical aspects in radical behaviorism; (2) identify and describe the values present in the Skinnerian ethical system; (3) conceptualize what cultural designs are; (4) identify values that may guide cultural interventions.
 
CAMILA MUCHON DE MELO (Universidade Estadual de Londrina (Londrina State University))
Camila Muchon de Melo is a psychologist with a degree from the State University of Londrina/UEL/Brazil (2000). She holds a master's degree (2004) and a Ph.D. (2008) in Philosophy from the Federal University of São Carlos/UFSCar/Brazil. She participated in a split-site doctoral program (2007) at the University of South Australia, under the supervision of Dr. Bernard Guerin. She conducted her postdoctoral research at the National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition and Learning between 2009-2012 (INCT- ECCE/UFSCar) while working with Dr. Julio de Rose. She was formerly an associate editor of Acta Comportamentalia (2015-2019) and is currently an associate editor of the Brazilian Journal of Behavior Analysis/REBAC (since 2016) as well as a reviewer for Behavior and Social Issues. She has been an Adjunct Professor in the Department of General Psychology and Behavior Analysis at UEL since 2012. She was the chair coordinator of the graduate program in Behavior Analysis/UEL (master’s and doctoral degree) between 2019-2021, and has been a supervisor since 2013. Since 2020 she has been a member of the Working Group 86/Theoretical Research in Behavior Analysis at the National Association for Research and Graduate Studies in Psychology (ANPEPP/Brazil). Camila carries out research in the areas of epistemology of radical behaviorism and culturo-behavior science.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #506
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Rule-Governed Behavior and Responding to One’s Behavior: Where We Were, Where We Are, and Where Are We Moving Forward
Monday, May 30, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: VRB; Domain: Theory
Chair: Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
CE Instructor: Carmen Luciano, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CARMEN LUCIANO (University Almeria, Spain)
Abstract: Early on, human beings learn to understand, formulate, and follow rules. This process requires learning to relate to and, consequently, derive contents about oneself, others, and the world around as well as to respond to all these contents. That is, the way we think, the emotion we feel, the rules derive and the function they have for responding in particular directions generate specific relational operants throughout multiple exemplars of responding to the own behavior, for good and for bad. This is the core of the analysis of human behavior, the analysis of suffering, and the therapy overcome it. In this context, this presentation aims to describe where behavior analysis was in the last portion of the previous century, where it is now, and where and how it is moving forward.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

All interested in behavior analysis, experimental analysis, the self, rule-governed behavior, relational frame theory, and clinical behavior analysis

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the functional perspective on rules and rule-governed behavior; (2) describe the conditions to learn to relate; (3) describe the conditions to derive thoughts, emotions, and selfing behavior; (4) identify the two functional relational operants of responding to the one’s behavior; (5) identify experimental protocols aimed to analyze selfing behavior, as deriving thoughts and rules about oneself and responding to them; (6) describe the functional principles in moving from ineffective relational operants to effective ones.
 
CARMEN LUCIANO (University Almeria, Spain)
Carmen Luciano graduated in 1978 and received her Ph.D. in the Complutense University of Madrid in 1984. She is Professor of Psychology at the University of Almeria since 1994 and at the University of Granada from 1979 to 1993. Her research dedication began on the experimental analysis of language. Her Postdoc Fulbright research stay in Boston University and the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, in 1985-86, was centered in studying problem-solving behavior under Skinner’s supervision. This was a critical point in her career as basic researcher. She was involved in the equivalence research, rule-governed behavior and, shortly after, in research of RFT and ACT. Her research lab has been -and it is- conducting basic creative experimental-applied RFT designs for the analysis of analogies, coherence, deictic and mainly hierarchical framing in the context of identifying core components of metaphors, false memories, experiential avoidance, values, defusion, selfing behaviors as responding to the own behavior. She designs brief ACT protocols and teaches ACT focused in analyzing the conditions under which emotions, thoughts, and valued motivation are brought to the present to build flexibility responding. She is Director of the Experimental and Applied Analysis of Behavior Research Group since 1986, where she has supervised over thirty doctoral theses - some of her students are running their own labs nowadays. She is also Director of the Functional Analysis in Clinical Contexts Doctoral Program in the University of Almeria, and Director of the Master Program in Contextual Therapies in Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology – MICPSY. Her research has been funded by international, national, and regional public funds. She has collaborated with research groups from different countries, and she has spread the functional analysis perspective in meetings, courses, research presentations, and publications. She is known for her exciting, precise, and creative style while teaching, working with clients, and doing research.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #542
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Operant Conditioning to Combat Addiction, Unemployment, and Poverty
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Elizabeth Kyonka (California State University - East Bay)
CE Instructor: Shrinidhi Subramaniam, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SHRINIDHI SUBRAMANIAM (California State University, Stanislaus)
Abstract: Over 37 million people in the United States lived in poverty in 2020. Poverty is a top risk factor for premature mortality and can exacerbate other health conditions like drug addiction. There is a clear relation between poverty, unemployment, and addiction. Addiction is more prevalent in unemployed than employed individuals and employment predicts positive treatment outcomes in people with addiction. Two evidence-based approaches to combat addiction and poverty are to: 1) treat addiction using incentives to promote drug abstinence (a proximal intervention), or 2) address poverty with education and job-skills training (a distal intervention). In this presentation, I will highlight behavior analytic research merging a proximal and distal approach to treat addiction in unemployed adults living in poverty. These studies evaluated the effectiveness of wage supplements to increase competitive employment and promote drug abstinence; assessed job readiness in this population; and incentivized job readiness activities during the search for employment. Interventions that promote full-time, steady employment can help improve socioeconomic position and have the added benefit of removing barriers to addiction recovery.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior analysis students, practitioners, and researchers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain the relation between unemployment and addiction; (2) describe how incentives promote drug abstinence and employment; (3) list the essential features of an operant antipoverty program.
 
SHRINIDHI SUBRAMANIAM (California State University, Stanislaus)
Dr. Shrinidhi Subramaniam is an Assistant Professor in Psychology at California State University, Stanislaus and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Dr. Subramaniam received her PhD in Psychology from West Virginia University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She teaches courses in applied behavior analysis, research methods, ethics, and addiction treatment, and mentors graduate students in their thesis research. Dr. Subramaniam’s research applies behavior analytic principles to solve problems like addiction, unemployment, and poverty in her community. Currently, her lab is evaluating the feasibility of a contingency management program to engage residential substance use disorder patients in continuing care. In addition to this work, she has published over 20 manuscripts and chapters across broad research interests. These publications include clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of behavioral interventions like incentives and education, and basic and translational studies exploring processes underlying human decision making such as choice and temporal learning. Dr. Subramaniam is an Associate Editor for The Psychological Record, is on the editorial board for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and serves as the Board Secretary of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior. She is the Association for Behavior Analysis, International’s 2022 winner of the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences Early Career Impact Award.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #543
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling in Italy as a Strategic Model for Service-Design Innovation
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 203
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Fabiola Casarini, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: FABIOLA CASARINI (Errepiu R+ Association)
Abstract:

For over a decade, CABAS was implemented in Italy by several learning centers that aimed to test the effects of education as a social innovation tool. We found that this model can provide schools and health services with an evidence-based system to design interventions that are both effective and efficient. Also, it greatly contributed to maintaining treatment integrity for children and adults with autism spectrum disorder during the COVID-19 pandemic. During these challenging times of economic and health crisis across the world, consequences for failing to design early and efficient ABA treatments were being highlighted by researchers. In addition, all countries in terms of reaching the “sustainable development goals” (SDGs) for fighting educational poverty, can do so only by providing people with a disability with individualized proper interventions. CABAS was able to offer help with identifying criteria for effective behavioral interventions, with particular attention to highly critical groups, such as people with autism. Luckily, the science of teaching provides researchers all over the world with a system to measure education. A growing number of research findings show that CABAS is among the most cost-effective educational model in the world. Moreover, its implementation across all age groups and for both special and general education, suggest that it is a cross-cultural, flexible tool for different contexts. Therefore, in Italy, we implemented it as a tactic within social, health and school services, for individuals with and without disability, from 18 months to adulthood. We found that the implementation of such a comprehensive model of education fits the need for sustainability of welfare systems drastically different from those in the United States. CABAS® was first replicated in Italy in 1991 and further expended through a great deal of applied research across various fields and disciplines. International replications are paving the way for further research and trans-disciplinary analysis of its effects, using longitudinal measurements and both criterion and norm-based data.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

ABA master and Ph.D. students, school directors, supervisors, service managers, community health advocates

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify indicators of educational poverty; (2) list five CABAS components; (3) describe CABAS as a model and a tactic.
 
FABIOLA CASARINI (Errepiu R+ Association)
Fabiola Casarini, Ph.D, BCBA, founded the first Italian Fab Lab for Education and is currently serving as Scientific Director for a network of CABAS(R)-based learning and research centers. She is President of "Errepiu R+" Association for the dissemination of Applied Behavior Analysis in Italy. She is the President of the Verbal Behavior SIG for AARBA (Italy Associate Chapter of ABAI) and one of the founders of ADC Italia, the national Association for Board Certified Behavior Analysts. She taught in several ABAI VCS courses trained dozens of doctoral students and professionals in the field. She promoted initiatives to fight educational poverty in Italy and she was awarded the Sustainable Innovators Award from Emilia-Romagna Region, in 2020, because of her initiatives for children during the Covid-19 pandemic. She has been a consultant for schools and publicly funded centers, also conducting workshops to raise awareness of science-based education. In 2018 she co-authored the first Italian book about the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis in Schooling, "Strategie Educative CABAS" with her mentor, R. D. Greer.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #558
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
Diversity submission A Risk-Driven Approach to Applied Behavior Analysis Across Ages: Implications for "Medical Necessity"
Monday, May 30, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 258C
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Patrick Romani (University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus)
CE Instructor: Rachel Taylor, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RACHEL TAYLOR (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is the “gold standard” for service provision aimed at helping young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the increased attention to this population may be detracting from the value associated with taking an ABA approach to support individuals of all ages, across a range of diagnoses. Further, the shift to define ABA as medically necessary for individuals diagnosed with ASD (APBA, April 10, 2020) requires effective patient, provider, and payor collaboration, and recent publications have highlighted the need for structured approaches to decision-making based in analytical ethics to support this transition. Accordingly, APBA released guidelines directing practitioners to provide services based on individualized risk exposure requiring a more patient-informed approach to care. The purpose of the current presentation is to outline a collaborative risk-driven approach designed to help guide practitioners to make ethically informed decisions regarding ABA service delivery, regardless of setting, age, or severity. Considerations regarding a potential divide between science and ABA-based service delivery will be addressed, including misconceptions about that which defines our professional and ethical obligations; specifically, how our related responsibilities extend far beyond particular ABA-based clinical programming procedures, necessitating constant empirical evaluation of the overall continuity of care for a given individual (e.g., placement, transition, community-based activities, and more).

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how ABA services need to be adjusted for individuals across a range of ages and diagnoses; (2) describe the benefits associated with adopting a risk-driven approach to ABA service delivery; (3) identify the defining features of “medically necessary” services and related implications for ABA-based practice across both crisis and non-crisis scenarios; (4) identify several common misconceptions regarding ABA-based practices and procedures and discuss crucial considerations related to established BACB ethical requirements.
 
RACHEL TAYLOR (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis)
Dr. Rachel Taylor (formerly Dr. Tarbox) has supported individuals diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders for more than 20 years. She started her career working in several prestigious institutions including the New England Center for Children and the Kennedy Krieger Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is the former Co-Director of Research and Development for the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) and the former Chief Clinical Offer for Intercare Therapy, Inc.. Dr. Taylor has also held several academic positions including founding Department Chair for the ABA Masters and PhD programs at The Chicago School of professional Psychology Los Angeles, and Faculty member in Psychology at the California State University Los Angeles and Channel Islands. Dr. Taylor is as an Advisor to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, Scientific Council member for the Organization for Autism Research, and former Executive Council member for the International Association for Behavior Analysis (ABAI), in addition to her longstanding service on the Board of Directors for the California Association for Behavior Analysis (CalABA), most recently as the 2020 Conference Chair. Her interests include 1) protecting against a potential divide between science and practice and 2) demonstrating how ABA produces socially significant improvements regardless of age or diagnosis.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE